Welcome to
Mr. Díaz
Classroom
 

You can be whatever you decide to be. The major obstacle is yourself / Tú puedes ser lo que tú decidas ser. El principal obstáculo eres tú mismo. 

 

During the years I was working for my Master of Science in Social Studies at Florida International University, I learned a lot from the outstanding professors I had. The ones that influenced me the most were Dr. Mohammed K. Farouk, Dr. William Walker, and Dr. Miguel Angel Escotet . I'm trying to make my class as relevant for my students as theirs were for me. Many of the ideas, concepts and principles expressed in this site: http://DiazSocialStudies.org, to which this section belongs, are the result of the wisdom, human solidarity, and good teaching of these scholars. I want this to be a tribute to all my teachers and professors, the ones that contributed to the man and the professional I am today. Thanks! Anything wrong in this web page is the result of my own limitations and mistakes; I hope you will excuse me for those.




Click on the topic you want to see

1-My Students / Mis Alumnos
1.1-Pictures of My Students (1996-Today)
2-Philosophy of History, in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
2.1-
Philosophy of History, in the Wikipedia Encyclopedia

2.2-Why Study History?, by Peter N. Stearns, in the American Historical Association.
2.3-
A Student's Guide to the Study of History , by Dr Steven Kreis
2.4-
Reading, Writing and Researching for History by Dr Patrick Rael
2.5-Reading Quest: Making Sense in Social Studies (Strategies) by Dr. Raymond C. Jones
2.6-
Internet Research: Theory & Techniques (The Spire Project)
2.7-How to Use the Internet for Research Purposes?
3-My Views on History / Mis Opiniones sobre Historia
4-Classroom Norms & Rules / Normas y Reglas de la Clase
4.1-Requiered Materials & Resources / Materiales y Recursos Necesarios
4.2-Syllabus of Courses / Programa de Cursos
4.3-Courses' Scope & Sequence/ Estructura de los Cursos
4.4-Grading Policy / Sistema Evaluativo
5-Projects / Proyectos
6-Video Analysis / Análisis de Videos Históricos
6.1-
World History

6.2-American History
6.3-Government / Economics
6.4-Form for Video Analysis (Questions)
7-Reading  / Leer
7.1-Book Reports / Reportes de Libros (Clásicos de la Literatura)
7.1.1-
World Literature Titles / Authors
7.1.2-
American Literature Titles / Authors
7.1.3-
Form for Book Report (Questions)
8-Assignments for Government / Economics /Actividades. Académicas de Gobierno / Economía
9-Recommended Software (CD ROMs) & Videos Programas.
10-
Recommended Books for  High School History Honors Classes.
11-Study Guides by Subjects & Units / Guías de Estudio por Asignatura y Unidades
12-"....one thousand words": PowerPoint Presentations by Subjects & Units:
12.1-
World History
12.2-American History
12.3-Economics / Government

13-Review for the Test / Repaso para el Examen
14-Views on Bilingual Education /Opiniones sobre la Educación Bilingüe
15-My Papers on Education / Mis Escritos sobre Educación
16-
Who is Mr. Díaz?
17-Rate Your Teacher
18-
Dear Substitute, here is your Lesson Plan for today

4-TEACHING & LEARNING SOCIAL STUDIES: SOME IDEAS
(Click on the title to go back to the table of contents)

YOU CAN TRANSLATE THE FOLLOWING PRINCIPLES FROM ENGLISH TO ANY LANGUAGE. CLICK ON THE DIAMOND

Philosophical Concepts, Principles, and Definitions

Before teaching / learning History, let's review some ideas about teaching and learning:


It is possible to store the mind with a million facts and still be entirely uneducated.

Alec Bourne

An education isn't how much you have committed to memory, or even how much you know. It's being able to differentiate between what you do know and what you don't.

Anatole France

Education is the best provision for old age.

Aristotle

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

Aristotle

Only the educated are free.

Epictetus

America believes in education: the average professor earns less money in a whole year than a professional athlete earns in a week.

Evan Esar

Good teaching is one-fourth preparation and three-fourths theater.

Gail Godwin

A fool's brain digests philosophy into folly, science into superstition, and art into pedantry.

George Bernard Shaw

A student by definition doesn't know what he or she doesn't know.

Michael Gorman

A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell, where his influence stops.

Henry Brooks Adams

A teacher is one who makes himself progressively unnecessary.

Thomas Carruthers

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former.

Albert Einstein

Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens.

Jimmy Hendrix

Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.

Henry Ford

Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it.

Henry David Thoreau

Learning is a treasure that will follow its owner everywhere.

Chinese Proverb

If you plan for a year, plant a seed. If for ten years, plant a tree. If for a hundred years, teach the people.

Kuang Chung

You are educated when you have the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or self-confidence.

Robert Frost

To teach is to learn twice.

Joseph Joubert

Education's purpose is to replace an empty mind with an open one.

Malcolm Forbes

As long as you live, keep learning how to live.

Seneca

Who dares to teach must never cease to learn.

John Cotton Dana

Education is to mould the human being for ongoing change and even for the eventual crisis which might arise as a result of the transition.

Miguel Ángel Escotet

The highest result of education is tolerance.

Helen Keller

There are two types of education... One should teach us how to make a living, And the other how to live.

John Adams

Whatever is good to know is difficult to learn.

Greek Proverb

The primary purpose of a liberal education is to make one's mind a pleasant place in which to spend one's leisure.

Sidney J. Harris

Education is not the filing of a pail, but the burning of a fire

William Butler Yeats

Pain makes man think. Thought makes man wise. Wisdom makes life endurable.

John Patrick

Education is the cheapest defense of nations.

Edmund Burke

He who opens a school door, closes a prison.

Victor Hugo

Teachers are more than any other class the guardians of civilization.

Bertrand Russell

What the teacher is, is more important than what he teaches.

Karl Menninger

Teaching that impacts is not head to head, but heart to heart.

Howard G. Hendricks

One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers, but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings.

Carl Gustav Jung

The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires.

William Arthur Ward

I touch the future, I teach

Christa McAuliffe

 

What is and how to achieve happiness? Buying objects / things?....That's what we are told every day by hundreds of commercial ads. Have knowledge and wisdom anything to do with happiness?


José Martí, a great Cuban thinker and patriot, once gave this advice in his famous Letter to Maria Mantilla, who many believe was his daughter:

"La elegancia..., -la grande y verdadera, -está en la altivez y fortaleza del alma. Un alma honrada, inteligente y libre, da al cuerpo más elegancia, y más poderío..., que las modas más ricas de las tiendas. Mucha tienda, poca alma. Quien tiene mucho adentro, necesita poco afuera. Quien lleva mucho afuera, tiene poco adentro, y quiere disimular lo poco. Quien siente su belleza, la belleza interior, no busca afuera belleza prestada: se sabe hermosa, y la belleza echa luz. Procurará mostrarse alegre, y agradable a los ojos, porque es deber humano causar placer en vez de pena, y quien conoce la belleza la respeta y la cuida en los demás y en sí."
José Martí
José Martí
Think about this...


I believe that the best way of teaching history is through:

 

Today, our students are more exposed and more sensitive to audiovisuals than ever. If we want to motivate them, to make History an attractive subject and to make our teaching relevant for the students of the 21st century, we have to use technology. Why do we -teachers- use so many audiovisual resources in our workshops and professional development activities, while we still want our students to learn with the old black / white board, outdated textbooks and boring lectures? There are ample resources available; let's use them.



The instructional strategies we use in our classrooms and the homework we assign to our students could make all the difference with regard to motivation, content coverage, learning, students' performance in major evaluations, discipline, and how relevant is history for them.




Let me now express my personal Philosophy of History.

Is history important? In what way? Is there a possible end to its development?
Is there a design, purpose, directive principle in the process of human history?
Which is the right way to study History: Leaders, Nations, Cultures, Processes?
Are there any broad patterns in History? Is History a linear progression (unilineal
or multilineal) or a series of cycles or just events that happen at random? Is
there an ultimate direction (positive or negative)? What are the diving forces in
History?

What is History?

History is a highly subjective and biased discipline. Historians, history teachers,

politicians, and all of us have our own interests, values, prejudices, and experiences,

even if we are unaware of having them. Most history is based on speculation and it

is totally touched by prejudice.

History is not an exact science, but a discipline trying to record and study the ideas and

actions of competing forces. The process of recording and studying is made by

individuals that are part and / or are affected by those same forces. However, using

the scientific method, historians today are trying to present the historical events and

the individuals involved in them in a broader and more inclusive way, trying to be

neutral or at least less prejudiced than years ago.

It is impossible to understand history or any other social discipline without

looking at the multiple perspectives and the different points of view of people with

regard to the events, theories, and schools of thought. Put yourself in the other

person's shoes to really understand he / she. Always ask what the other side has to

say; look for a balanced picture.

In history, like in daily life, most of the times the extremes are both wrong. Do

not look for people, events, or decisions totally good or bad, black and white; look at

the shadows in the middle. Behind every extremist you will find an opportunist. Look

beyond simplistic explanations, consider a wide range of interacting factors,

ramifications, and diverse plausible causes and consequences. Most of the times, the

middle road and a good compromise are the best solution.

History is the study of culture and power. Names, dates, and particular historical

events should be tools to determine patterns, trends, and the causes and

consequences of historical processes. History is not a blind concatenation of events,

but a meaningful whole, an evolutionary process ruled by laws.

History is our collective memory, our source of personal identity, our way to

immortality. History extends human life beyond its span. History is our connection

with the past and our guide to build the future avoiding the repetition of old

mistakes. But we humans have short memory and never learn from history.

Society is a distinct entity that is part of nature with which it constantly

interacts; it is inseparable from the rest of nature and, like nature, it is also ruled by

laws; its own laws, even when chance and accidents have also had a role in the

history of human society.
 

Driving Forces in History: Competition & Wars

History is competition and a continual process of conflict; this competition or conflict

could be peaceful if the resources are enough for all and tolerance is present or if

man is able to share fairly, or it could be violent, which has predominated along

history. War is the worst form of human competition and it has been present almost

always. Some historians think that peaceful times are only unnatural and

exceptional interludes that tend to cease as a result of changes in the distribution of

military power. Competition produces winners and losers and it is the main cause of

economic, social, and political inequalities. There are not "good wars", but the only

"acceptable war" is one in self-defense. Some believe that war is a "necessary evil"

to destroy what is old and to build something new and better. Nations and leaders

have always found excuses for war and their people have always been tricked to

support them and to die in them. Will we, common people, learn from history?

Cooperation increases with social development, but it is only a form of

competition. We cooperate in “our group” (family, community, church, party,

ethnic group, and / or nation) in order to be stronger to succeed in our competition with

other groups.

The society is formed by material and intellectual elements that are constantly

interacting. The material components of the social life are the support and

determine the philosophical, political, moral, legal, and aesthetic ideas developed by

any particular society. One powerful force is the profit motive. The intellectual

components have a relative independence. They may lag behind or run ahead of the

material development at any historical point. The circumstances and quality of the

interaction will influence the development of the intellectual part.

Some societies have produced outstanding individuals that have been able to

affect the course of history. Their ideas and actions have accelerated or retarded the

development of society.

Historical events have been driven by the competition for material resources,

power, cultural, ethnic or national supremacy, social recognition, glory or vanity,

and / or religious prevalence.
 

Historical Evolution , Progress, and Happiness.

Evolution, progress and happiness are not necessarily interchangeable concepts.

Evolution means change and everything changes constantly following some patterns

and laws when we analyze long periods of time. Progress means accumulation of

knowledge and more efficient technologies to struggle with nature and among

ourselves. Man has used the products of progress to achieve many negative and

destructive goals. It doesn't lead automatically to the reduction of poverty or to a

better quality of life. Happiness is at the same time objective and subjective: a

state of mind or emotional satisfaction, no necessarily dependent on economic status,

level of progress, or evolutionary stage; but also dependent on the satisfaction

of basic needs (material, spiritual, moral, and cultural needs).

History doesn't happen by chance as a trend, even when chance has played an

important role in history. It is the result of evolution following some objective laws;

laws that man can learn and use to take the right decisions. In history, like in nature,

change is constant and nothing is forever; everything has its end, from powerful

individuals, empires and social systems, to planets, stars and solar systems.

The history of society is a chain of steps and sometimes leaps forward, in a

universal process of continuous and directional progress, with periods of boom and

dust, of war and peace, whose trend has been the evolution of the human society

from more simple, lower social systems to the more complex, higher ones. This

doesn't mean that we move away from a past that is dead and that History is

completely irreversible. We frequently look back to learn and take from the

past, usually to try and / or apply some of those experiences that worked, that

were successful to our new circumstances. The past is always with us. This is one

of the reasons why we need to learn History.

What has meant progress for some social groups has been misery or destruction

for others. Same things happen in nature. Scientific and economic development have

supported and promoted the evolution of the human society but have also created

the basis for its potential destruction and extinction.

Peoples have made history in accordance with objective conditions. As mankind

evolves, the role of the people in history rises and the number of people taking part

in the historical process is larger. This fact considerably accelerates the course of

history. Ancient history lasted a lot longer than medieval and modern history. The

periods become shorter along the evolutionary process.
 

Role of Leaders & Heroes

Historical events are frequently showed as the result of the actions of powerful

and talented heroes and leaders without any stain in their lives. Heroes and leaders

are common people, they are not perfect or superhuman that deserve blind worship.

They grow out of their times and lands, they are the products and symbols of

historical events as well as their agents and voices.

Great leaders and heroes do not appear by chance but by historical necessity,

when their character, skills, and intelligence are needed by society at a given stage of

development. Without a particular environment, their ideas and actions would be

untimely and impracticable. A great individual becomes really great only when he /

she understands the objective course of history and he / she dedicates his efforts and

energies to promote progress. The role of leaders is very important, but no one can

determine the course of history following only his own will; the society as a whole

produces and determines what leaders are able to do.  Before a great man can produce

significant changes in his society, his society must make him.
 

The State and History

The state is a product of society's internal development and of the emergence of

different socio-economic groups. It is a political instrument to promote order, to

develop and enforce the laws, to guarantee the welfare of all the citizens, and to

provide justice for all. However, the state will give priority to the interests of the

ruling socio-economic group. It protects the values and ideas prevailing in a

particular society, in a particular time.
 

What type of history have we studied?

History has been the story of victors and elites. Europe has been considered the

center of world civilization while all other peoples have been exhibited as savages.

The history of America has been the history of the Anglo-Saxon, Protestant

white male. The role of common people and minority groups in history is often

underestimated and distorted. Today, scholars and schools are trying to change

this wrong vision.

Civilization, manhood, progress, honor, culture, and development, have been used

and manipulated to justify and support some of the most barbaric and unfair causes

in history.
 

Revising History

We all are historians, writing and telling our lives' stories, reinterpreting and

changing those stories as we mature, stressing some events in our lives and trying to

forget others. Professional historians do the same things. History has been and is

being rewritten constantly, according to the social and economic changes that have

occurred and depending on the moral values and political systems predominating in

any particular period in history.
 

Equality, Democracy and Freedom: Socio-Economic Groups, Gender, & Race in History

We are all different. Inequality is a natural trait present in all things in Nature.

In history, equality and freedom have been opposed concepts only reconciled by

utopist philosophies; when one has prevailed, the other has died. Equal educational

opportunities and a rational redistribution of wealth leading to an environment of

social justice could be an achievable middle point between these two extremes.

Equality has different meanings depending on who defines it. For some, it is

synonym of equal opportunities and having certain common rights; it is also

considered as the set of equal basic natural capabilities present in most human

beings; for many religions, equality in the sight of God means the power of all

human beings to take decisions, to do right or wrong, to choose between good and

evil. It is also presented as the result of legislation regulating and ensuring access to

a broad set of economic opportunities and “free” social services for all citizens.

What we call intelligence is mostly the result of personal experience, education,

and opportunity. Most of us have the capability to be civilized and prosperous

individuals under the right circumstances, to be talented artists, scientists,

philosophers, and political leaders.

Socio-economic groups, gender, and race have emerged historically as social

constructions and as a result of competition to allow the oppression of some groups

over other men and women, to create and maintain a system of hierarchies that

assigns power and privilege to some people and that prevents or limits the access of

other people to material resources, knowledge, and positions of leadership.

This system of social hierarchies is a web formed by a variety of interdependent

variables that are mutually constitutive. Socio-economic status, gender, race, and

oppression have been inseparable; they have constructed, supported, and reinforced

one another; their goals have been to divide, to set groups of people against each other,

to promote prejudices and hate among them, to make them weak, to create a

discriminatory system of dominance in which "deviants" and non-conforming

individuals could be used as scapegoats for all the social problems.

Great civilizations have emerged in every corner of our planet and as the result of

the effort of people with every type of skin. Egyptians, black Dravidic peoples,

Aryans, Chinese people, Mayas, Semites, Greeks, Romans, and all the others have

done their part. Women have always been half of the world population and have

shared with men the difficulties and the achievements. Young and old people, gays

and straight individuals, the rich and the poor, manual workers and intellectuals

have all contributed to the advance of civilization.

The struggles against racism, sexism, anti-Semitism, homophobia, elitism,

ageism, and so on should be inextricable linked. History should teach us that

civilization is a cooperative product for which all peoples have contributed; it is our

common heritage.

The color of our hair, eyes, or skin; our religious beliefs, sex or age; the place

where we live, the language we speak and our form of government, are all part of

being humans and being different and this should not be the foundation or excuse

for oppression or dominance. We all should be respected with our differences and

have the same opportunities and rights.

Democracy is the right and real capability of the people to participate in politics

and government, to elect and be elected for public office, to enjoy the universally

accepted human rights, to have choices and the ability to take political decisions. It

must consider principles such as popular sovereignty, majority rule, protection of

minorities, constitutional liberties, pluralism, periodic free and clean elections, social

mobility, and many others. A controversial question is How far should it extend?

Democracy implies compromising. It eventually emerges as the result of the

struggle for power among non-democratic elites on either the Left or the Right; it is

not the preferred outcome for any of the struggling groups, but a kind of truce or

compromise between the warring factions.

In order to create and preserve a lasting democratic government, the people has

to be prepared, to have an education; a particular set of social values, traditions,

and structures are needed. Tolerance, legality, a civic culture, and social justice are

required. A strong sense of national unity and the capability and practice of the

principle of self-government in towns, corporations, professional associations,

provinces or states, universities, and so on. Economic prosperity and stability are

very important requirements to create and sustain a democratic system.

Freedom is a relative concept. The first condition of freedom is its limitation;

make it absolute and it dies in chaos. You could be free to starve and to be homeless

or to own guns and to belong to organizations that promote hate and death. For

some scholars, freedom means having the material, intellectual and legal capabilities

to take decisions and to fully participate in the political and social life. It could also

mean anarchism or being free of the tutelage or control of other individuals or

authorities. Freedom also is defined as the ability of individuals, as judges of their

own interests, to order their lives following their own principles. Freedom for many

is an ideal, a state of mind in which man will achieve satisfaction and happiness;

something that man is always trying to accomplish, but whose objectives he never

completely fulfills in a never ending quest.
 

Human Rights

Some historians and politicians divide human rights in different categories, levels

or generations. They argue that the concession or validation of some right will

exclude or affect other rights. Even though most nations subscribed them, most of

them, including many of the liberal democracies, violate many of the rights in the

Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Of course, dictatorships and totalitarian

systems occupy the first places in the list of violators.

The rights # 22-28 are the more controversial for conservative politicians and

scholars in developed nations and the most demanded for poor people and nations.

Personally, I believe that in order to have a real democracy, nations must comply

with all of the following rights, which could be considered as an ideal social project

to be achieved for every civilized nation.

1.All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed

with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of

brotherhood.

2.Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration,

without distinction of any kind, such as race, color, sex, language, religion, political

or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore,

no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international

status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent,

trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

3.Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

4.No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be

prohibited in all their forms.

5. No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or

punishment.

6. Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

7. All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal

protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in

violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

8. Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals

for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

9. No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

10. Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent

and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any

criminal charge against him.

11. Everyone charged with a penal offense has the right to be presumed innocent until

proved guilty according to law in a public trial at which he has had all the guarantees

necessary for his defense. No one shall be held guilty of any penal offense on account

of any act or omission which did not constitute a penal offense, under national or

international law, at the time when it was committed. Nor shall a heavier penalty be

imposed than the one that was applicable at the time the penal offense was committed.

12. No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home

or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honor and reputation. Everyone has the

right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.

13. Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders

of each state. Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to

return to his country.

14. Everyone has the right to seek and to enjoy in other countries asylum from

persecution. This right may not be invoked in the case of prosecutions genuinely

arising from non-political crimes or from acts contrary to the purposes and principles

of the United Nations.

15. Everyone has the right to a nationality. No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his

nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

16. Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or

religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights

as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution. Marriage shall be entered into

only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses. The family is the natural

and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the

State.

17. Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.

No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.

18. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right

includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in

community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in

teaching, practice, worship and observance.

19. Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes

freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart

information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

20. Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association. No one

may be compelled to belong to an association.

21. Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or

through freely chosen representatives. Everyone has the right of equal access to public

service in his country. The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of

government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall

be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free

voting procedures.

22. Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to

realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance

with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural

rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

23. Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and

favorable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment. Everyone,

without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work. Everyone who

works has the right to just and favorable remuneration ensuring for himself and his

family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other

means of social protection. Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for

the protection of his interests.

24. Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of

working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

25. Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and

well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical

care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of

unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in

circumstances beyond his control. Motherhood and childhood are entitled to special

care and assistance. All children, whether born in or out of wedlock, shall enjoy the

same social protection.

26. Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the

elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory.

Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher

education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit. Education shall be

directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of

respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. It shall promote understanding,

tolerance and friendship among all nations, racial or religious groups, and shall further

the activities of the United Nations for the maintenance of peace. Parents have a prior

right to choose the kind of education that shall be given to their children.

27. Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to

enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits. Everyone has the

right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific,

literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

28. Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and

freedoms set forth in this Declaration can be fully realized.

29. Everyone has duties to the community in which alone the free and full

development of his personality is possible. In the exercise of his rights and freedoms,

everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as are determined by law solely for

the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and freedoms of

others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general

welfare in a democratic society. These rights and freedoms may in no case be

exercised contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

30. Nothing in this Declaration may be interpreted as implying for any State, group or

person any right to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at the

destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth herein.
 

History, Values, and Human Nature

There are not such things as absolute truths and values. Everything is constantly

changing. Human values, goals, abilities, virtues and sins have changed with time,

depending on the places of residence and as a result of historical progress.

Different nations, cultures, and / or groups of individuals have different ideas

and interests. In history, every vice was once a virtue and what is wrong for some

peoples is sacred for others. What was a virtue yesterday could be considered a

weakness today.

Beware of the propaganda frequently present out there. Values and truths have

being socially constructed: they are products of particular social situations; they

developed because of particular social needs; particular individuals support them;

and they are directed to achieve particular goals. The dominant values and truths at

any point have never addressed the needs and ideas of all the people.

On the other hand, there are some attitudes that have always been present:

Cooperation, Fairness, Solidarity, Love, Honesty, Integrity, Kindness, Curiosity,

Ingenuity, Pursuit of Excellence, Respect, and Responsibility are some of the

positive traits of human civilization. Appropriate nurture and education has

always been the best ways to tame human nature and develop its best side. But at the

same time, we can find man's inhumanity to man as a constant in history: Greed, Sadism,

Envy, Thirst of Power, Racism, Intolerance, Fanaticism, and Lust have led humans

to Crucifixions, Slavery, Piracy, the Guillotine, Colonialism, Rapes, Massacres

(including women and children), Lynching, Political Purges, Concentration Camps,

Atomic Bombs, Ethnic Cleansings, Terrorism, and constant wars. We can see behaviors

in some humans that not even the most fierce and savage animals are able to have.

Only fear to exemplary punishment (religious, social or legal) has limitedly restrained

the evil and lowest instincts of man.
 

Religion & History

Many religions have emerged in history; many of them at some point have

promoted divisions among men and have served to justify wars and to support

oppression. World religions have some differences and many points in common.

Many people try to prove that their God is better than somebody else's God is.

However, most common religious people try to find their own way to create a better

world, a better man, a better future. The theoretical and real essence of most

religions is to find peace, to do good, to spread love, to achieve happiness, and to help

people. In that sense, religion is good. It is not true that religion is harmful by nature.

Man has always needed to have faith, in all cultures, in all times. Of course, you can

have faith and not practice any religion in particular. And, if you don't have faith,

then you need a powerful and comprehensive philosophy, but we need ideas

and a set of values to protect us from ourselves and from our weaknesses, to restrain

the evil in us. Very frequently, men need to escape from the sad and ugly reality to

travel to the world of imagination, dreams, and spirituality. I deeply believe that there

is a supreme force, god, or spirit, but like Voltaire once said, even assuming that

there is not God, we need to create one; we need to believe in something.

Religion is a powerful source of hope, compassion, moral values, discipline, consolation,

and support for the social order. Religion should promote equality, social justice, and

democracy as long as it is based on tolerance and love.

Some historians say that religion and communism are divergent utopias:

 when one goes down the other goes up. Some believe that religion has kept

the poor from murdering the rich. Others think that religion accommodates itself to

any social circumstance in order to survive; that religion has many lives and the habit

of resurrection; some even have said that religion is the opium to dominate or

oppress the people. Religious fanaticism, fundamentalism, and intolerance have

been -and still are- real calamities in human history.

Today, in most nations, religion is a private matter. Faith and worship are the

result of individual and inner beliefs and convictions. Institutions, hierarchical

bureaucracies, and spiritual leaders can help or not. They are not indispensable for

individuals to become good persons, to be close to God, and to do good. Faith

could be a private and intimate feeling that some people share only with their own

consciences, in their own ways, in the intimacy of their minds or families. In order to

be genuine and valid, faith hasn't to be exhibited in public or being regulated by

an institution. Let's think for a second that there is one Supreme Being, Creative Force,

Universal Order or Spirit. We don't need to assign, frame, limit this Being / Force /

Spirit with a name, sex, ethnicity, or religion. Let's think that the Universe,

Nature, and Life are good and that man can be good too, following the natural laws

of this perfect system of things. Let's try to leave behind the evil and hate created

by man. Let's live with hope and try to be positive.

Every person has the right to believe and find his / her own answers to the

mysteries of the universe, nature and life. There are different forms to find peace, to

do good, to spread love, and to achieve happiness. Respect, understanding, honesty,

social justice, and knowledge should help us to find the truth. We must try to

promote those things that unite us, try to find a common ground in which we can

become better human beings.

Human Life

This is a major issue today for many: pro-life, pro choice, abortion, contraceptives,

birth control, sexual abstinence, euthanasia, the death penalty. and the sacredness of life.

I personally see a lot of hypocrisy in all this. What's the point in fighting abortion or birth

control and doing nothing for the millions of children starving in the world, for the millions

living without health insurance right here in the wealthiest nation in the world, or those

being abused while under the supervision of government agencies. Where is the noble cause

in eliminating or cutting funds for government programs for the elderly and allowing the

never-ending increase of costs of health care and prescriptions for senior citizens that many

can't afford and sending to jail medical doctors (Dr. Kevorkian) trying to help those suffering

without hope. In what way is fair allowing to live those raping and killing a five-years old girl

or beating to death a six-months old baby or practicing / selling child pornography or giving drugs

to little children. How can you reconcile the idea that life is sacred with the bombing of civilians,

torture of prisoners of war, and killing of thousands, just because they belong to another country

or faith or they don't like our way of life. How can you support human life and promote the sale

of guns almost to anybody and the sale of violence to children (video games, movies, TV shows).

I understand that politics is a necessary evil, that there is not and never will be a perfect

government / political system, that world powers have always been abusive, that the business

of America is business, and that in order to have abundance for some, others  have to suffer.

But please, don't tell me that it's fair or that we do it for the sacredness of human life.
 

History, Economics & Politics

Huge problems are affecting the world because of the disproportionate

distribution of resources among nations and within each nation. Fundamental social

changes are required. But revolutions, wars, terrorism, and other forms of violence

will only beget more violence; the violent overthrow of a hierarchical system based

on social differences will lead only to a new system of social hierarchies, repeating

the vicious cycle of violence. Revolutions are very dangerous; they are like snowballs

on a slope. It's not easy to get them going, but once they are on their way it's even

harder to stop them from rolling and growing until they become destructive avalanches.

The growing gap between the wealthiest and the poorest makes unstable the global

and national equilibrium of human society, leading to a critical situation whose unfolding

could only take us -according to history- to reforms through legislation redistributing

wealth or to violence and revolution destroying wealth and distributing poverty.

Terrorism, a frequent form of violence used today, promotes hate, the death of

innocent people, and more violence as a response; it may be the result of the lack

of political space for some groups in the global arena, of fanaticism and extreme ways

no leading to any solution, the consequence of the despair of oppressed groups at

their inability to change the status quo and promote reforms; it is the crazy answer

of desperate people because of their impotence to obtain respect and have their

place in the world. It is also a political weapon used by promoters of violence

and crime, by drug dealers, by practitioners of religious intolerance, by people

who don't respect human lives and other devilish individuals pretending that

they are revolutionaries, heroes or martyrs, while they refuse to accept the

changes of the times. We need more controls, stricter regulations and to punish

any group or individual -here first, within our own country- asking for violence

and intolerance, talking about supremacy and hate, denigrating America

or her values and symbols; we must seriously control the access to guns, explosives,

chemicals and biological products; we need to teach patriotism and love

for our institutions and freedom; we need to be very careful with the type of people

we accept as immigrants; we must be implacable with the enemies of democracy

and freedom. We need a more equitable, open to reforms, fair and peaceful world

without violence, terrorism, and abusive powers.

It's time for sharing, for the world community to build a global society

in which every nation and group benefits and every decent person respects

and supports his fellow global citizens and punishes any violator of the world

peace and order. We need justice and the opportunity to achieve

happiness for every human being in the world, not just for us and our friends.

Capitalism has proven to be the most efficient an stable socio-economic system so

far. The profit motive and free economic competition stimulate productivity and

economic development like no other system. Other economic experiments like

slavery, police supervision, or ideological enthusiasm have proved to be too

unproductive, too expensive, or too transient. However, capitalism is not perfect.

Many problems should be addressed to improve it. It has showed its possibilities to

evolve, to accept reforms, to change, to become more democratic and inclusive.

Communism has proved to be a theoretical utopia whose practical application

has led to political dictatorships, economic failures, and social mirages.

There is not a pure or perfect formula or economic system with all the answers

for the world problems, there has never been and there will never be such a thing.

The right and left extremes have been defeated and social democracy, a new New

Deal, or another way in the middle of the economic and political spectrum,

which should be open to permanent improvement, should replace them. Liberalism,

as Smith saw it, led the world to destructive extremes and failure in the 1930’s; it

represents the past not the future.

Competition between conflicting forces has been a powerful stimulus to promote

development and find answers to address human needs through history. However,

today it seems to be no antagonistic forces competing to find those answers using

different ways. Because of this, some historians consider that we have reached the

end of history or the end of ideological evolution, that liberal democracy is the

highest and final solution.

Perhaps, the future opponents that will emerge from the current historical

conditions may be the global corporations and the governments of the national

states, or they may be the corporations struggling against each other to control the

world. Maybe, a new social group produced during this Age of Information in the

most developed nations will challenge the dominant class and lead a new revolution.

Who knows?

Neo-liberalism is only one more transition to something better. Humanity still has

a long way forward and a lot to improve and advance; we still have not found all

the answers we need and have not walked all the possible ways; we still have

reserves and options. This doesn't mean that the solutions are around the corner

and that the alternatives are clear. We should find new ways, use the best

experiences from every source, learn from past mistakes and advance along the road

of progress whose end is still far away, trying to be understanding, civilized, pacific,

and tolerant beings. History and progress will end only with the end of civilization,

with the end of intelligence, with the end of the planet. I believe that good will prevails

over evil, that man will achieve an even better future for everyone.

Nature and Us

We are not the center of the Universe, but a tiny point in it; man is just a

microscopic part in that infinite space. Nature is the cradle and supporting source of

human life. We are part of Nature; we should not try to conquer it or deplete it, but

try to understand it, learn how to live within it and preserve it. Our ingenuity has

helped us to overcome many problems and to be stronger in our relation with the

forces of Nature. However, Nature can destroy everything we have created in just

seconds or we can provoke natural catastrophes as well.

We do not own the Earth; we are just one species living in it, one that has to

learn how to respect and coexist with the other inhabitants of the planet or pay the

price for its lack of humbleness: extinction.

Insatiable consumerism, the belief in the possibility of an endless economic

growth, and the policies promoting a throwaway economy, are wrong practices that

will lead the world to its exhaustion. There should not be a contradiction between

progress and the preservation of our environment, between science and Nature. The

point here is not the dichotomy of seeing trees and mountains as raw materials to

deplete or as places of rest and contemplation, but the unavoidable reality that we

have to protect our home, to save it for the future, to act with responsibility, to

establish a balance and find a middle point in the long line of our contradictory and

growing needs.

We must teach our students that our resources are not limitless, that small can be

beautiful, that they shouldn't want what they don't really need, that saving for

tomorrow is wise.
 

Teaching Social Studies

Controversy and conflict are at the heart of social studies; this discipline should

promote democracy and freedom of expression. We can't and we shouldn't

“protect” students from “difficult issues”, but help them to understand those issues;

we shouldn't try to impose our ideas to them, but help them to form their own ideas.

The most important question in history is why? Always look for the causes and

consequences of historical events. Many times the real causes are concealed.

Research is historian's most valuable tool to find the truth. We should teach our

students to dig deep !!!

Indoctrination is the result of closing minds on open issues. We should promote

open-mindedness, help our students to accept that nobody is right all the time and

that in real life things are not always neat and clear; they should learn to live with

ambiguity. We should teach them to consider impartially the available facts, to be

willing to change their current beliefs, to not make judgments based on inconclusive

evidence, to leave the door open.

Freedom of ideas is the cornerstone of democracy and progress; the idea of

diversity of ideas and cultures is necessary to give substance to the concept of

freedom. Freedom of thought has little meaning if all people think and believe the

same things. Fanaticism of every kind (religion, politics, and sports) is a harmful disease.

It is impossible to learn history without learning economics, philosophy,

geography, literature, and art at the same time. Do not try to memorize historical

facts, names, or dates, but try to analyze, understand, evaluate, and learn from

them. Look for trends, processes, causes and consequences.

The teaching of social studies, more than any other discipline, is dominated by

textbooks. And students are right: history books are boring; most of the times

they exclude conflict, debate, controversy, real suspense; they do not make people

think critically. Very frequently, books are full of errors of omission and distortion.

While these books are changed, in order to learn social studies, students should

review multiple sources of information: encyclopedias, atlases, almanacs, magazines,

the Internet, and many others; they have to visit the library frequently; they have to

watch movies and documentaries; they need to review primary sources. The classroom

isn’t enough.

Teachers have to present the topics in an interesting way, stressing the major

issues. Teachers should motivate students to look for additional information and to

ask questions; they should facilitate productive discussions in which all students can

share their opinions.

We must promote resistance to stereotyping, labeling, and trying to understand

people based only on a limited and narrow set of characteristics. We have to identify

the diversity within any group of people, the full range of human attributes of any

ethnic or national group. Every individual is a particular world. Try to

communicate with people, to learn about and from them before judging them.

Teachers should promote non-chauvinism: teach our students not to prejudice

their judgments about others because they are not affiliated with them, not

to discount unfairly the interests of others even if, on occasion, they are incompatible

with their own interests. We have to fight fanaticism, blind obedience, and

unreasoning devotion. We must teach our students to act in an equitable, civil and

humane way, to consider the well-being of others, to respect the interests and rights

of others. Tolerance is critical to achieve peace and happiness.

We should prepare our students to deal with the unexpected, with contingencies,

and even with chaos. Life is change; nothing remains the same. Social studies is a

good tool to help them to foresee future problems, to find possible solutions and

alternatives, to adapt to changes, to assimilate the inevitable.

Teaching social studies is not just transmitting knowledge. We should care not

only for the cognitive progress, but also for the affective and emotional

circumstances of our students. Besides being students, they are persons and we are in

the business of dealing with social issues and helping persons to be better human

beings.

 

Carlos J. Díaz

 

Note: Most of the views, philosophical concepts and / or principles presented here, which are critical when

you try to understand the history of mankind and other social sciences, were not developed by me. Many of them

are very old; some were written by great minds; others are linked to more recent events; and just a few are the

 result of my own thinking . This summary doesn’t look for originality or scholarly newness. I’m just trying to

put together some ideas for my students or any other person interested in learning History to consider them,

to promote analysis and debate, to open a civilized dialogue.  Please, participate and express yourself.
 
 
 
 

5-Classroom Norms & Rules / Normas y Reglas de la Clase
(Click on the title to go back to the table of contents)

GENERAL INFORMATION & CLASSROOM RULES / INFORMACION GENERAL & REGLAS DE LA CLASE
 
 

BASIC NORMS / NORMAS BASICAS

 1-RESPECT AND GOOD MANNERS / RESPETO Y MANERAS ADECUADAS

2-READ TEXTBOOK'S CHAPTER IN ADVANCE, PAY ATTENTION TO THE LECTURE & TAKE NOTES /

LEER CAPITULO DEL LIBRO ANTES DE LA CLASE, ATENCION A LAS EXPLICACIONES & TOMAR NOTAS

3-ALL STUDENTS SHOULD BRING A DICTIONARY DAILY / TODO ALUMNO DEBE TRAER UN DICCIONARIO DIARIAMENTE

4-DO YOUR HOMEWORK / CUMPLIR CON LAS ACTIVIDADES ACADEMICAS ASIGNADAS PARA DESPUES DE CLASES

5-ASK FOR PERMISSION TO INTERRUPT RAISING YOUR HAND / SOLICITAR AUTORIZACION LEVANTANDO LA MANO

6-STUDENTS CAN CREATE CONTENT SUMMARIES USING INDEX CARDS AND BRING & USE THEM DURING QUIZZES / LOS ESTUDIANTES PUEDEN HACER SUMARIOS DE CONTENIDO USANDO PEQUEÑAS TARJETAS Y TRAER Y USAR LAS MISMAS DURANTE LAS EVALUACIONES PERIODICAS EN CLASES
 
 

ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES / ACTIVIDADES ACADEMICAS

1-A NEW UNIT EVERY ONE / TWO WEEKS. LECTURE NOTES AVAILABLE FOR EACH ONE /

CADA 1 ó 2 SEMANAS SE EXPLICA UNA UNIDAD DE CONTENIDO. GUIAS DE ESTUDIO DISPONIBLES PARA CADA UNA.

2-CONTENT PRESENTED USING CLASS WEBSITE / TRANSPARENCIES.  TAKE NOTES. /

USO DE PAGINA WEB / TRANSPARENCIAS PARA LAS EXPLICACIONES. TOMAR NOTAS EN LA CLASE.

3-VIDEOS IN SOME UNITS; QUIZZES / TESTS AFTER EACH CHAPTER. /

VIDEOS EN ALGUNAS UNIDADES; EXAMENES DESPUES DE CADA CAPITULO.

4-READINGS EVERY WEEK (ENGLISH) / LECTURAS RELACIONADAS AL CONTENIDO DE CADA UNIDAD (INGLES).

5-PROJECTS BY TEAMS / PROYECTOS POR EQUIPOS

6-FILM ANALYSIS / ANALISIS DE FILMS HISTORICOS

7-ESSAYS ON SELECTED TOPICS / ESCRIBIR COMPOSICIONES SOBRE TEMAS SELECCIONADOS

8-COMPETITION AMONG TEAMS BASED ON ACADEMIC RESULTS / LOS EQUIPOS COMPITEN SEGUN RESULTADOS ACADEMICOS

9-THINKING MAPS or GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS IN SOME CHAPTERS / GRAFICOS IN ALGUNOS CAPITULOS

10-STUDY OF PRIMARY SOURCE DOCUMENTS or OBJECTS / ESTUDIO DE DOCUMENTOS ORIGINALES
 
 

REWARDS / ESTIMULOS

 1-MONTHLY: CERTIFICATES FOR THE BEST STUDENTS

MENSUALMENTE: DIPLOMAS A LOS MEJORES ALUMNOS.

2-AT THE END OF THE SCHOOL YEAR: TROPHIES / MEDALS FOR THE BEST STUDENTS IN EACH CLASS /

A FIN DEL CURSO: TROFEOS / MEDALLAS A LOS MEJORES ALUMNOS DE CADA CLASE.
 
 

DISCIPLINE / DISCIPLINA

 1-WARNING / AVISO O LLAMADA DE ATENCION (Two)

2-BE TEMPORARILY EXCLUDED FROM THE CLASSROOM (CSI) / EXCLUSION DE LA CLASE. ENVIADO A CSI. (3rd)

3-PARENT CONFERENCE MEETING / LLAMADA A LOS PADRES (3rd)

4-REFERRAL TO AN ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL/ REFERIDO A UN SUBDIRECTOR

5.1-REQUIRED MATERIALS & RESOURCES / MATERIALES Y RECURSOS NECESARIOS

1-English-Spanish Dictionary or E-Translator for ESOL students / Diccionario Inglés-Español o Traductora para Alumnos de ESOL 1/2
1.1-The Merriam-Webster's High School Dictionary (ISBN-0-03-096484-9) or Equivalent for Every Student / El Diccionario de Inglés para la Escuela Secundaria Superior de Merriam-Webster (ISBN-0-03-096484-9) o Equivalente para todos los Alumnos -
2-Knowledge and Access to a Personal Computer (Word Processor & Power Point) / Conocimiento y Accesso a una Computadora Personal
3-Knowlege and Access to the Internet & E-Mail / Conocimiento y Acceso a la Internet y Correo Electrónico
4-Access to a Printer / Acceso a una Impresora
5-Three Sides / Faces Project Poster Board / Cartón de Tres Caras para Proyectos
6-Glue Sticks (4) / Goma de Pegar (4 Barras)
7-Scissors / Tijeras
8-Stapler and Box of Staples / Presilladora y Caja de Presillas
9-Color Paper / Papel de Colores
10-An Atlas / Un Atlas
11-A Thick Notebook for each Semester / Una Libreta Gruesa para cada Semestre
12-Access to a TV & VCR / Acceso a Televisor y Casetera de Video
13-Money to Rent 20 Movies During the Year / Dinero para Alquilar 20 Películas Durante el Año
14-Money for Photocopies / Dinero para hacer Fotocopias
15-Two or Three Diskettes / Dos o Tres Disquetes de Computadora
16-A Box of No. 2 Pencils / Una Caja de Lápices No. 2
 

Access to Computers, TV-VCRs, Printers, Enciclopedias, Atlases, Xerox / Copy Machines is available in the school library and in most public libraries. / El acceso a computadoras, impresoras, fotocopiadoras, TV-VCRs, enciclopedias y atlases esta disponible en la biblioteca de la escuela y la mayoría de las bibliotecas públicas


 

7-GRADING POLICY / SISTEMA EVALUATIVO
(Click on the title to go back to the table of contents)

GRADING POLICY / SISTEMA EVALUATIVO
(World and American History)

 

Grading Policy

All academic evaluations will be based on the letter grade system (A, B, C, D, F); I usually grade on a curve, according the results of the class in each evaluation. In Conduct: students that had to be warned from time to time for behavioral problems may receive B/C; students that were sent to CSI at least once for disruptive behavior may receive D/F. In Effort: students with A, B, C will receive 1; students with D will receive 2; and students with F will receive 3. For class participation you will receive 5% of your grade. The best students will receive certificates every month and trophies at the end of the school year.

 

1-Quizzes (one per chapter), Thinking Maps, Knowledge Contests (in teams)

20%

2-Classwork (one per chapter / in teams)

20%

3-Reseach Projects (one per month / homework in teams)

20%

4-Reading Quizzes, Reading Plus (homework / progress), Reading Contests (in teams)

15%

5-Film Analysis (homework / 5 per nine weeks)

15%

6-Primary Sources and Essays

5%

7-Class Participation

5%

Notes: Bring Index Cards & a Dictionary to Quizzes. Do Make-up Work (Chapter Summary / two pages per “F”) to replace any “F” with a “C”. Any work received late will receive a lower grade.

 

 

AP WORLD HISTORY

Assignments and Grading Policy

Chapter Quizzes..........................................................................................30%

Reading and Analyzing Primary Sources.......................................................20%

Writing DBQ, CCOT and CC essays..........................................................30%

Weekly Homework (Vocabulary, Annotated Maps, Chapter Charts, and Reading of textbook chapters in advance)....................................................................20%

 

A = 100 – 90 B =   89 – 80 C =   79 – 70 D = 69 – 60   F = less than 60 points


SOME THINKING MAPS / GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS


 
 

8-PROJECTS / PROYECTOS
(Click on the title to go back to the table of contents)

CONTENT & STRUCTURE OF THE WORLD HISTORY PROJECTS

1-DEFINITION / SUMMARY.

2-BIOGRAPHIES OF KEY LEADERS / PERSONALITIES.

3-TIMELINE / CHRONOLOGY. MAJOR EVENTS.

4-HISTORICAL MAPS.

5-RELIGION, MORAL VALUES, PREVAILING PHILOSOPHY (IES).

6-BUILDINGS, WEAPONS, DAILY ACTIVITIES, CLOTHES, INVENTIONS. (PICTURES)

7-WORKS OF ART AND LITERATURE (SCHOOLS, STYLES, MOVEMENTS).

8-WARS / BATTLES. OUTCOMES.

9-CAUSES (WHY) AND CONSEQUENCES / EFFECTS.

10-DIFFERENT POINTS OF VIEW (VICTORS & LOSERS / RULERS & COMMON PEOPLE). CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES. WRITE  A FIVE-PARAGRAPHS ESSAY.

11-TEAM’S EVALUATION / JUDGMENT OF THIS PERIOD IN HISTORY: LIST PROS & CONS. CONTRIBUTIONS TO HUMANITY.

12-STATISTICS / GRAPHS / TABLES

FORMAL REQUIREMENTS:

1-POSTER BOARD OR POWER POINT PRESENTATION OR WEB PAGE W/ THE INFO

2-USE OF COLOR

3-USE OF PICTURES

4-IDENTIFICATION OF WHO DID WHAT

5-TEAM'S NAME

 

US HISTORY PROJECTS FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR

The research can be done in teams (no more than 4 students per team) or individually. Students from different classes may work together. History Labs are worth the equivalent of eight grades each. There is a Research Project per month or two per grading period. The info should be placed on a poster board (teams) including the title / subject, all topics, an appropriate decoration and design; the use of color is expected. Projects should be turn in by the due day or earlier; for each day it is late, it will receive a letter grade down. Copy & Paste will not be tolerated.

 1-September: American Civil War

a. Summary (two pages)

b. Biographies of key leaders (6-one page each) w/ pics. Separate North & South.

c. Timeline (main events- one page)

d. Causes & Consequences (one page)

e. Battles (6-half a page each) w/pics

f. Flags, Uniforms & Weapons (Separate North & South). Pics

g. Songs / Hymns (North & South / Lyrics). Separate North & South.

h. Films about the topic (4). Pics w/ titles

i. Maps (3)

j. Primary Sources: Gettysburg Speech & Emancipation Proclamation.

k. Advantages & Disadvantages of North & South (Separate North & South)

l. Strategies of North & South. (Separate North & South)

m. Statistics (charts)

n. Reconstruction Period (1865-75): Major Events (two pages)

2-October: Settling the American West

a. Summary (two pages)

b. Biographies of key leaders (6-one page each) w/ pics

c. Timeline (main events- one page)

d. Causes & Consequences (one page)

e. The Louisiana Purchase & Lewis & Clark Expedition (one page + pics)

f. The Mexican War (one page)

g. The Manifest Destiny (one page)

h. Primary Sources: Indian Removal and Homestead Acts

i. Indian Wars: List & one paragraph per war.

j. Farmers vs. Ranchers & Cattle Drives (one page)

k. Famous Old West Towns and Gunfights. Dime Novels. American Legends. Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show

l. Gold Rush (one page)

m. The Transcontinental Railroad

n. Immigrants and the West

 The rest of the Projects will be called  "American Decades”.

 Students are expected to use the following sources:

·        ABC TV Series “The Century. America’s Time”, in Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC8D9DC28C3EC5223

·        "Wikipedia's Timeline of USA History":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_United_States_history#20th_century

·        "America's Story" from America's Library, Library of Congress: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/index.php

·        "American Decades, Primary Sources", by Gale, 10 volumes / one per decade, available online for our students: http://galesites.com/menu/hia33638 (click on GVRL, password: hialeah, then go to American Decades)

·        Investigating US History: http://investigatinghistory.ashp.cuny.edu/ (useful for some decades / topics)

·        History Matters. The U.S. Survey Course on the Web. : http://historymatters.gmu.edu/

·        Decade by Decade: http://history1900s.about.com/od/decadebydecade/

·        InfoPlease, Year by Year: http://www.infoplease.com/yearbyyear.html

·        The People History: http://www.thepeoplehistory.com/yearsanddecades.html

·        EyeWitness to History: http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/20frm.htm

·        Fast Facts from US Census: https://www.census.gov/history/www/through_the_decades/fast_facts/

·        Infotopia: http://www.infotopia.info/am_history_decades.html

·        The USA History Lab: https://www.pinterest.com/historylab/

 Topics that each Project should include:

a.       General Facts (Population, life expectancy, average salary, unemployment, etc.)

b.      People & Personalities. Presidents during period.

c.       Economy.

d.      Main Policies: Domestic & Foreign. Political Parties.

e.       Social & Political Movements & Reforms.

f.        Main events / Timeline

g.       Art & Architecture

h.       Literature: Authors & Books

i.         Education

j.        Fads & Fashion

k.      Technology

l.         Music, Theater, Films, Radio & TV

m.     Key Supreme Court Cases & Decisions

For every topic include info (at list one  full page) & pics.

List of Projects "The Decades" per Month

3-November: 1890-10 & 1910-19 (includes Imperialism & WW I)

4-December: 1920-29 & 1930-39 (includes Roaring Twenties, Great Depression & New Deal).

5-January: 1940-49 & 1950-59 (includes WW II, The Golden Years & Early Cold War).

6-February: 1960-69 & 1970-79 (includes Civil Rights Mov., Vietnam War, etc).

7-March: 1980-89 & 1990-1999 (includes Detente, Collapse of Communism, etc.).

8-April: 2000-2015 (includes War on Terror, Great Recession, Obama, etc.).

 

History Projects: Rubric (Grading Criteria)

CATEGORIES TO BE GRADED

POOR: (1)

ACCEPTABLE: (2)

ACCOMPLISHED: (3)

EXCELLENT: (4)

TOTAL POINTS

CONTENT / INFORMATION

Printed directly from the Internet or simple copy / paste

Many spelling and grammar problems

More than three (3) and less than five (5) topics are missing

Only one source of info was used

Student has paraphrased the info he/she found or has used a Thesaurus to change words.

Several spelling and/or grammar problems

More than two (2) topics are missing

At least two sources were used

Student has read and summarized the info he/she found in the sources.

Some spelling and/or grammar problems

No more than one topic is missing

At least three sources were used

Student has read the info, analyzed and synthesized the content, and presented it in his/her own words

Evaluations, comments and conclusions are included

Grammar and spelling are OK

All topics were covered

Several sources were used

GRAPHICS / PICTURES

Only a few pictures

No maps

No use of color

No decorations at all

No balance between big / small pictures

Pictures without captions

Some b&w pictures covering some topics

Only required maps

No use of color

Some decorative elements

Balance between big and small pictures

Some pictures have captions

Enough pictures, some color pictures and some b&w, covering most topics

Several different maps

Use of color

Acceptable decoration

Balance and harmony in the use of pictures and other graphics

All pictures with captions

Many color pictures covering all topics

Several different maps

Use of color

Great and creative decoration

Balance and harmony in the use of pictures and other graphics

All pictures with captions

STRUCTURE / DESIGN

In any of these cases:

Title and/or team's info is missing

No Poster Board

Lack of creativity, not design at all

Papers falling from the board, not secured.

No order and/or sequence. Papers and pictures appear in a negligent fashion

Title and team info are included

Use of a different type (one face) of Poster Board

Info is not organized in sections, but there is some kind of design

Some papers are loose or could fall

Some disorder and inappropriate sequence

Title and team info are included

Use of a Three Sides / Faces Project Poster Board

Use of sections or "pockets", but some topics are not identified

Most papers and pictures are properly secured. Use of tacks or push-pins.

Logical order and sequence

Title and team info are included

Use of a Three Sides / Faces Project Poster Board. (The board could be replaced by a Power Point Presentation or a Web Page, as long as all the other requirements are present.)

Well defined sections or "well organized pockets"

Use of cover-pages for every section

Papers and pictures secured: stapled or glued

Creativity; logical order and sequence

Time

Project was two days late

Project was one day late

Project was turn in on time

Project was turn in on time

C + G + D + T = Final Grade A=4 B=3 C=2 D=1

4

10-READING IN HISTORY / LEER EN HISTORIA

1-Ervin, Jane (2000). Reading Comprehension in Varied Subject Matter. Cambridge, MA. Educators Publishing Service, Inc. (www.epsbooks.com). Book 1 - 6.

2-Ervin, Jane (2000). More Reading Comprehension in Varied Subject Matter. Cambridge, MA. Educators Publishing Service, Inc. (www.epsbooks.com). Level 1 -4.

3-Broukal, Milada (2004). What a World. Amazing Stories from Around the Globe. White Plains, NY. Pearson Education, Inc.

4-Broukal, Milada (2001). What a Life. Stories of Amazing People. White Plains, NY. Addison Longman, Inc.

1-Durant, Will & Ariel (1993). The Story of Civilization. MJF Books. Volumes 1-11

2-Weber, Eugen (1995). The Western Tradition. 5th. Ed. Lexington, MA. D. C. Heath and Company. Vol. 1-2.

3-Johnson, O. A. & Halverson, J. L. (2004) Sources of World Civilization . 3rd. Ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.. Pearson Prentice Hall. Vol. 1-2

4-Lawall, Sarah & Mack, Maynard (2002). The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 2nd. Ed. New York, NY. W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. (http://www2.wwnorton.com). Vol. A-F.

5-Encyclopædia Britannica (2002). Great Books of the Western World. Chicago, Ill. Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc. (www.britannica.com])

6-Andromeda Interactive (1996). Classic Library. Over 2,000 Great Works of World Literature (on CD ROM, PC & MAC). Alameda, CA. Andromeda Interactive. Tel: 1-800 769 1616 or 1-510 769 1616. Email: andromint@aol.com

7-COREL CD Home Series (1995). World's Greatest Classic Books. Over 3,500 of the World's Best Literary Works from the Greatest Writers of all Time (on CD ROM, For Windows). Salinas, CA. COREL / UCA&L. 1-800 455 3169 or 1-613 728 1010.


11-BOOK REPORTS / REPORTES DE LIBROS
(Click on the title to go back to the table of contents)

Classics of World Literature for Book Reports
 
 

Students of World History should read and write reports about two of the following books / stories / poems every period of nine weeks, answering the attached questions. Considering that some of these works of literature/politics/philosophy/economics may be too difficult for nine grade students, the use of Cliff Notes, Spark Notes, Barron's Book Notes, Bloom's Notes, or any other supporting reviews / summaries are accepted. Also, students may ask in their favorite library for versions of these books adapted for young readers. Most of these works should be available in Spanish.
 
 
 

First Nine Weeks: Ancient Literature

Anonymous (Akkad, 2500-1500 B.C.)

Gilgamesh

Egyptian Literature

Anonymous (?)

Hymn to the Nile

Anonymous (?)

The Book of the Dead

Akhenaten (1500-1200 B.C.)

Hymn to the Aton / Sun

Anonymous (1100-1000 B.C.)

Wenamon’s Journey

Assur-nasir-Pal (Assyria, 885-860 B.C.)

Annals

Several Authors (Hebrew, 1000-300 B.C.)

The Bible, Old Testament

Greek Literature

Homer (700’s B.C.)

The Iliad,

The Odyssey

Aeschylus (524?-456 B.C.)

The Oresteia, Prometheus

The Eumenides

Sophocles (496-406 B.C.)

Oedipus the King

Antigone, Electra

Euripides (480-406 B.C.)

Medea

Andromache

Plautus (255-184 B.C.)

Aulularia or The Pot of Gold

Aristophanes (448-385 B.C.)

The Knights, Lysistrata

The Clouds, The Peace

Plato (427-347 B.C. )

Philosophic Dialogues (See The Republic)

Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)

Ethics, Politics, Poetics

Plutarch (45-125 A.D.)

Parallel Lives

Chinese Literature

Anonymous (1000-600 B.C.)

Classic of Poetry

Lao Tzu (China, 500? B.C.)

Classic of the Way and Virtue

Confucius (551-479 B.C.)

Analects

Chuang Chou (369-286 B.C.)

Chuang Tzu

Ssu-Ma Ch’ien (145-85 B.C.)

Historical Records

Hindu Literature

Valmiki (?-350 B.C.)

The Ramayana

Anonymous (400 B.C. - 400 A.D.)

The Mahabharata

Anonymous (300’s B.C.)

The Jataka

Anonymous (100-0 B.C.)

The Bhagavad-Gita

Latin / Roman Literature

Cicero (106-43 B.C.)

On the Commonwealth

On the Laws

Virgil (70-19 B.C.)

The Aeneid

Horace (65-27 B.C.)

Satires, Odes

Ovid (43 B.C.-A.D. 17)

Metamorphoses

Seneca (4 B.C.-A.D. 65)

The Epistles

Petronius (??-A.D. 66)

The Satyricon

Several Authors (0-100 A.D.)

The Bible, New Testament
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Second Nine Weeks: Medieval Literature

Western Literature

Augustine (Italy, 354-430)

Confessions

Benedict of Nursia (Italy, 490’s?-543)

Rule of St. Benedict

St. Thomas Aquinas (Italy, 1225-1274)

On the Existence of God

Anonymous ( England, 800’s)

Beowulf

Anonymous (France, 1100)

The Song of Roland

Anonymous (Germany, 900‘s)

Lohengrin

Anonymous (Germany, 1100‘s)

The Song of the Nibelungs

Gottfried von Strassburg (Germany, 1210?)

Tristan and Isolde

Anonymous (Spain, 1150‘s)

The Cid

Don Juan Manuel (Spain, 1282-1349)

The Book of the Examples of Earl Lucanor

Juan Ruiz, Arcipreste de Hita (Spain,1300’s)

The Book of the Good Love

Anonymous (Iceland, 1200’s)

Thorstein the Staff-Struck

Dante Alighieri (Italy, 1265-1321)

The Divine Comedy

Giovanni Boccaccio (Italy, 1313-1375)

The Decameron

Anonymous (England, 1190’s)

Robin Hood

Geoffrey Chaucer (England, 1340-1400)

The Canterbury Tales

India

Visnusarman (100-200 )

Pañcatantra

Kalidasa (300’s)

Sakuntala and the Ring of Recollection

Bhartrhari (400’s)

Satakatrayam

Amaru (600’s)

Amarusataka

Somadeva (1000)

Kathasaritsagara

China & Japan

Tao Ch’ien (365-427)

The Peach Blossom spring

The Return, Elegy

Yuan Chen (779-831)

The Story of Ying-ying

Sei Shonagon (966-1017)

The Pillow Book

Murasaki Shikibu (973-1016)

The Tale of Genji

Li Ch’ing-Chao (1084-1151)

From Records on Metal and Stone

Anonymous (1371)

The Tale of the Heike

Anonymous (Africa, 1280’s-1320‘s)

The Mali Epic of Son-Jara

Islamic Literature

Allah / Mohammed (610-632)

The Koran

Ibn Ishaq (704-767)

The Biography of the Prophet

Abolqasem Ferdowsi (932-1025)

Shahname

Faridoddin Attar (1145-1221)

The Conference of the Birds

Jalaloddin (1207-1283)

Robais, Ghazals, Spiritual Couplets

Birdsong, The Glance

Sa’di (1200’s)

Golestan

Anonymous (1300’s)

The Thousand and One Arabian Nights
 
 
 
 

 

World History. Titles / Authors for Book Reports, Third Nine Weeks

The Renaissance and Reformation in Europe
 

Francis Petrarch (Italy, 1304-1374)

Inmost Thoughts, On Solitary Life

Concerning Famous Men,

On the Remedies for Good and Bad Fortune

Desiderius Erasmus (Netherlands, 1466-1536)

The Praise of Folly

Niccolo Machiavelli (Italy, 1469-1527)

The Prince

Ludovico Ariosto (Italy, 1474-1533)

Orlando Furioso

Baltasar Castiglione (Italy, 1478-1549)

The Book of the Courtier

Francois Rabelais (France, 1495-1553)

Gargantua and Pantagruel

Michel Eyquem Montaigne (France, 1533-1592)

Essays

Rene Descartes (France, 1596-1650)

Discourse on Method,

Meditationes de prima philosophia,

Principia philosophiae

Blaise Pascal (France, 1623-1662)

Provincial Letters,

Thoughts: An Apology for Christianity,

Thomas More (England, 1478-1535)

Utopia

Francis Bacon (England, 1561-1626)

The Advancement of Learning,

De Augmentis Scientiarum, Essays,

Novum Organum, The New Atlantis

William Shakespeare (England, 1564-1616)

Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet,

The Merchant of Venice,

Othello, King Lear, Macbeth,

The Taming of the Shrew

Ben Jonson (England, 1572-1637)

Every Man in His Humour,

Every Man out of His Humour,

The Poetaster , Eastward Ho!,

Epicoene, The Alchemist, Bartholomew Fair,

Sejanus, Catiline, Timber; or, Discoveries

Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679)

The Leviathan

Daniel Defoe (England, 1659-1731)

Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

John Milton (England, 1608-1674)

Paradise Lost

Luis de Camoes (Portugal, 1524?-1580)

The Lusiads
 
 

The Golden Century in Spain (1500‘s-1600’s)
 
 

Fernando de Rojas (1473?- 1541)

La Celestina or Tragicomedy of Calixto and Melibea.

García Rodríguez de Montello (1500’s)

Amadis de Gaula

Bernal Diaz del Castillo (1492-1581)

The True History of the Conquest of New Spain

Garcilaso de la Vega (1501–1536)

Eglogas

Tirso de Molina (1538-1648)

El Burlador de Sevilla

Anonymous (1552?)

El Lazarillo de Tormes

Mateo Aleman (1547 1614?),

Vida y hechos de Guzman de Alfarache

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)

Don Quixote of La Mancha

Lope de Vega (1562-1635)

Fuente Ovejuna

Luis de Góngora (1561-1627)

Hermana Marica, La Mas Bella Niña

Píramo y Tisbe

Francisco de Quevedo (1580-1645)

La Historia de la vida del Buscón Llamado Don Pablos

Pedro Calderon de la Barca (1600-1681)

Life is a Dream

The Mayor of Zalamea

Alonso de Ercilla (Chile, 1533-1594)

La Araucana
 
 

The Reformation
 
 

Martin Luther (Germany, 1483-1546)

The Ninety-Five Thesis

John Calvin (France, 1509-1564)

The Institutes of the Christian Church
 
 

The Enlightenment or The Lights’ Century
 
 

Jean Baptiste Poquelin (Moliere) (France, 1622-1673)

Tartuffe, The Bourgeois Gentleman

The Precious Ridiculous Ladies

Jean Racine (France, 1639-1699)

Phaedra, Berenice

Montesquieu (France, 1689-1775)

The Spirit of the Laws

Voltaire (France, 1694-1778)

Candide or Optimism

Jean J. Rousseau (France, 1712-1778)

The New Heloise, Emile

The Social Contract, Dialogues

Carlo Goldoni (Italy, 1707-1793)

The Mistress of the Inn, The Fan,

The Beneficent Bear, The Accomplished Maid,

Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz (Mexico, 1648-1695)

Reply to Sor Philothea de la Cruz

The Trials of a Noble House

Love, The Greater Labyrinth

Jonathan Swift (England, 1667-1745)

Gulliver’s Travels

Alexander Pope (England, 1688-1744)

The Rape of the Lock

An Essay on Man

Henry Fielding (England, 1707-54)

Tom Jones
 
 

The Rationalists

Baruch Spinoza (Netherlands, 1632-77)

A Treatise on Religious and Political Philosophy,

Ethics, Opera Posthuma

Gottfried W. Leibniz (Germany, 1646-1716)

Essais de Théodicée sur la bonté de Dieu, la liberté de l'homme,

et l'origine du mal; Monadology;

Nouveaux Essais sur l'entendement humain,
 
 

The Empiricists

John Locke (England, 1632-1704)

An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

Two Treatises of Government

George Berkeley (Ireland, 1685-1753)

Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision,

A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge,

Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous,

David Hume (Scottland, 1711-1776)

The Essay on Miracles
 
 

German Philosophy

Immanuel Kant (Germany, 1724-1804)

Critique of Pure Reason, Critique of Judgment,

Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics,

Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals,

Critique of Practical Reason, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone

Georg W. Friedrich Hegel (Germany, 1770-1831)

Phenomenology of Mind, Science of Logic,

Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences,

Philosophy of Right

Arthur Schopenhauer (Germany, 1788-1860)

The World as Will and Representation,

On the Will in Nature, The Basis of Morality,

Essays from the Parerga and Paralipomena

Ludwig Andreas Feuerbach (Germany, 1804-72)

The Essence of Christianity,

Geschichte der neueren Philosophie,

Gottheit, Freiheit und Unsterblichkeit
 
 

Revolution and Romanticism
 
 

Johann W. Goethe (Germany, 1749-1832)

Faust, The Sorrows of Young Werther

Friedrich Schiller (Germany, 1759-1805)

William Tell

E.T.A. Hoffmann (Germany, 1776-1822)

Weird Tales, Night Pieces,

The Devil’s Elixir, Murr, the Tomcat

William Blake (England, 1757-1827)

Songs of Innocence, Songs of Experience

Mock on, mock on, Voltaire, Rousseau

William Wordsworth (England, 1770-1850)

Poems

George Gordon, Lord Byron (England, 1788-1824)

Fugitive Pieces, Hours of Idleness,

English Bards and Scotch Reviewers,

Cantos I , II, III, IV of Childe Harold

The Prisoner of Chillon, Beppo, Mazeppa

John Keats (England, 1795-1821)

Poems

Mary Shelley (England, 1797-1851)

Frankenstein

Pierre de Beaumarchais (France,1732-1799)

The Barber of Séville, The Marriage of Figaro

Victor Hugo (France, 1802-1885)

The Hunchback of Notre Dame

The Miserable, Ninety-Three

Prosper Mérimée (France, 1803-1870)

Colomba, Carmen

Jose de Espronceda (Spain, 1808-1842)

Poems, The Devilish World

The Student of Salamanca

Jose Zorrilla (Spain,1817-1893)

Don Juan Tenorio

Juan Varela (Spain, 1824-1905)

Cartas Americanas,

Florilegio de Poesías Castellanas del Siglo XIX,

Pepita Jiménez, El Comendador Mendoza

Juanita la Larga

Gustavo Adolfo Becker (Spain, 1836-1885)

Rhythms, The Green Eyes

Legends, From my Cell

Ramon de Campoamor (Spain, 1817-1901)

Doloras, Humoradas, Pequeños Poemas

Rosalia de Castro (Spain, 1837-1885)

Cantares Gallegos, Follas Novas

En las Orillas del Sar

Cirilo Villaverde (Cuba, 1812-1894)

Cecilia Valdes o La Loma del Angel,

El Penitente, Dos Amores

Alexander Pushkin (Russia, 1799-1837)

Ode to Liberty, Russlan and Ludmilla

The Prisoner of the Caucasus,

The Fountain of Bakhchisar

The Gypsies, Boris Godunov,

The Captain's Daughter, Eugene Onegin

The History of the Pugachev Rebellion
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Realism, Naturalism, Symbolism and Modernism in Literature.

Economic Revolution, Nationalism, Imperialism and Communism.

(The 19th Century)



Stendhal (Marie Henri Beyle) (France, 1783-1842)

The Red and the Black, The Charterhouse of Parma

Armance, Lamiel, Lucien Leuwen,

The Green Huntsman, The Telegraph
 
 

Honore de Balzac (France, 1799-1850)

The Magic Skin, Eugenie Grandet, Father Goriot,

The Lily of the Valley, Lost Illusions,

Cousin Pons, Cousin Bette
 
 

Alexandre Dumas, Sr (France, 1802-1870)

The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After,

The Vicomte de Bragelonne, The Count of Monte Cristo

The Lady of Monsoreau , Forty-Five, The Black Tulip
 
 

Gustave Flaubert (France, 1821-1880)

Madame Bovary
 
 

Charles Baudelaire (France, 1821-1867)

The Flowers of Evil
 
 

Alexandre Dumas, Jr. (France, 1824-1895)

The Lady of the Camelies, The Prodigal Father,

Diane de Lys, The Money Question, The Natural Son,

The Strange Woman, Denise
 
 

Jules Verne (France, 1828-1905)

Five Weeks in a Balloon, Michael Strogoff

A Journey to the Center of the Earth,

From the Earth to the Moon, The Mysterious Island,

Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea,

Around the World in Eighty Days
 
 

Emile Zola (France, 1840-1902)

Therese Raquin, , Nana, The Tavern

Germinal, Fruitfulness, Labor, Truth
 
 

Benito Perez Galdos (Spain, 1843-1920)

National Episodes, Mrs. Perfect, Tristana

León Roch‘s Family, Fortunata and Jacinta
 
 

Vicente Blasco Ibañez (Spain, 1867-1928)

The Mayflower, The Cabin, Reeds and Mud,

The Shadow of the Cathedral,

The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
 
 

Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (Argentine, 1811-88)

Facundo, Life in the Argentine Republic in the Days of the Tyrants
 
 

Jose Hernandez (Argentine, 1834-86)

Martín Fierro, The Return of Martin Fierro
 
 

Ricardo Palma (Peru, 1833-1919)

Tradiciones Peruanas
 
 

Emilio Salgari (Italy, 1863-1911)

Sandokan, The Tiger of Malasia, The Black Corsair,

The Tigers of Mompracem, New Adventures of Sandokan,

Captain Storm, Damasco’s Lion
 
 

Adam Smith (Scotland, 1723-90)

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations
 
 

Thomas Malthus (England, 1766-1834)

An Essay on the Principle of Population,

Principles of Political Economy
 
 

David Ricardo (England, 1772-1823)

The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation
 
 

Charles Darwin (England, 1809-82)

Origin of Species, The Descent of Man
 
 

Charles Dickens (England, 1812-1870)

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club

Oliver Twist, Nicholas Nickleby, Barnaby Rudge

Master Humphrey's Clock: The Old Curiosity Shop,

A Christmas Carol, Dombey and Son,

The Chimes and The Cricket on the Hearth. David Copperfield,

A Tale of Two Cities
 
 

Charlotte Bronte (England, 1816-55)

Jane Eyre, Shirley, Villette, The Professor

Emily Jane Bronte (England, 1818-48)

Wuthering Heights

Anne Bronte (England, 1820-49)

Agnes Grey, Tenant of Wildfell Hall
 
 

Wilkie Collins (England, 1824-1889)

The Woman in White

The Moonstone
 
 

Robert Louis Stevenson (Scotland, 1850-94)

Treasure Island, Prince Otto, The Black Arrow,

A Child's Garden of Verses, Kidnapped,

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

The Master of Ballantrae, The Weir of Hermiston
 
 

Oscar Wilde (Ireland, 1854-1900)

Poems, Vera, The Happy Prince

Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories

The House of Pomegranates, An Ideal Husband

Picture of Dorian Gray, Lady Windermere's Fan,

A Woman of No Importance, Salomé,

The Importance of Being Earnest
 
 

Joseph Conrad (England, 1857-1924)

The Nigger of the Narcissus, Lord Jim, Chance,

Nostromo, The Secret Agent, Under Western Eyes
 
 

Arthur Conan Doyle (England, 1859-1930)

A Study in Scarlet, The Sign of the Four,

The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes,

The Hound of the Baskervilles, His Last Bow,

The Return of Sherlock Holmes,

The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes,

The White Company
 
 

Rudyard Kipling (England, 1865-1936)

Plain Tales from the Hills, Soldiers Three,

The Light That Failed, The White Man's Burden

Mandalay, Gunga Din, The Jungle Book

Kim, Captains Courageous
 
 

H. G. Wells (England, 1866-1946)

The Time Machine, The Wonderful Visit,

The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds,

Kipps, Tono-Bungay, The History of Mr. Polly,

The World of William Clissold, World Brain

The Shape of Things to Come,

Mind at the End of Its Tether
 
 

Karl Marx (Germany, 1818-83)

& Friedrich Engels (Germany, 1820-95)

The Communist Manifesto

The German Ideology

Karl Marx (Germany, 1818-83)

The Poverty of Philosophy

Das Kapital, A Critique of Political Economy

Friedrich Engels (Germany, 1820-95)

The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844

Anti-Dühring, The Peasant War in Germany

The Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State
 
 

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (Germany, 1844-1900)

The Birth of Tragedy, Thoughts out of Season,

Human, All Too Human; The Dawn of Day,

The Joyful Wisdom, Beyond Good and Evil
 
 

Henrik Ibsen (Norway,1828-1906)

Love's Comedy, Brand, Peer Gynt,

The League of Youth, Pillars of Society,

A Doll's House, Ghosts, Hedda Gabler,

An Enemy of the People, The Wild Duck,

The Master Builder, When We Dead Awaken
 
 

Nikolai Gogol (Russia, 1809-1852)

Evenings on a Farm near Dikanka, Dead Souls

Mirgorod, The Overcoat, The Inspector-General
 

Ivan Turgenev (Russia, 1818-1883)

A Sportsman's Sketches, Rudin, A Nest of Gentlefolk

On the Eve, Fathers and Sons, Smoke, Virgin Soil,

A Month in the Country, A Provincial Lady,

First Love, A Lear of the Steppe, Torrents of Spring
 

Fyodor Dostoevsky (Russia, 1821-1881)

Poor Folk, The Double, The House of the Dead

The Insulted and The Injured, The Gambler

Winter Notes on Summer Impressions,

Notes from the Underground,

Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov
 

Leo Tolstoy (Russia, 1828-1910)

Childhood, Boyhood, Youth

The Cossacks, War and Peace,

Anna Karenina, The Kreutzer Sonata

The Death of Ivan Ilyich, The Power of Darkness

Resurrection, The Living Corpse
 

Anton Chekhov (Russia, 1860-1904)

Motley Stories, At Twilight, At Twilight

The Island of Sakhalin, Ivanov, The Three Sisters

The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, , The Cherry Orchard
 

Maxim Gorky (Russia, 1868-1936)

My Universities, Sketches and Stories,

Mother, Reminiscence, The Lower Depths,

The Life of Klim Samgin
 

Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (Russia, 1870-1924)

What is to be Done?; One Step Forward, Two Steps Back,

Two Tactics of Social-Democracy in the Democratic Revolution,

Materialism and Empiric-Criticism, New Tasks and New Forces,

Three Sources and Three Component Parts of Marxism,

The Right of Nations to Self-Determination,

Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism,

The National Colonial Question, The Left Wing of Communism
 
 

Modernism
 
 

Jose Marti (Cuba, 1853-1895)

Our America, Ismaelillo, Simple Verses,

Free Verses, The Golden Age

Ruben Dario (Nicaragua, 1867-1916)

Blue, Profane Prose, Songs of Life and Hope,

The Wandering Song, Autumn's Poem

Amado Nervo (Mexico, 1870-1919)

Serenity, Elevation, Plenitude

Jose E. Rodo (Uruguay, 1872-1917)

Ariel, The Motives of Proteo, Próspero's Balcony

Leopoldo Lugones (Argentina, 1874-1938)

The Golden Mountains, Twilights in the Garden,

Sentimental Almanac, The Gaucho War
 
 
 
 

 

World History. Titles / Authors for Book Reports, Fourth Nine Weeks

Contemporary Literature. The Twentieth Century. 

World Wars I and II. The Cold War. The Collapse of Communism.
 
 

Generation of ‘98
 
 

Pio Baroja (Spain, 1879-1956)

The Struggle for Existence, The Quest,

Weeds, Red Dawn, Memoirs of a Man of Action

Jose Martinez Ruiz (Azorin) (Spain,1873?-1967)

The Will, Antonio Azorín, Don Juan

Ramon del Valle Inclan (Spain, 1866-1936)

The Pleasant Memoirs of the Marquis de Bradomín,

Aromas de leyenda, Águila de Blasón, Femeninas,

La Marquesa Rosalinda, Luces de Bohemia

Miguel de Unamuno (Spain, 1864-1936)

The Tragic Sense of Life in Men and Nations,

Our Lord Don Quixote, The Agony of Christianity,

Mist, Three Exemplary Novels and a Prologue,

Aunt Tula, Abel Sanchez

Antonio Machado (Spain, 1875-1939)

Complete Poems
 
 

Other Spanish Writers
 
 

Jacinto Benavente (1866-1954)

Bonds of Interest, The Gay and Confident City,

The Passion Flower

Juan Ramon Jimenez (1881-1958)

Platero and I

Jose Ortega y Gasset (1883-1955)

Meditaciones del Quijote, España Invertebrada,

The Modern Theme, The Revolt of the Masses,

Toward a Philosophy of History, Man and People

The Mission of the University, Concord and Liberty,

The Dehumanization of Art, Man and Crisis

Miguel Hernandez (1910-42)

Songbook of Absences

Federico Garcia Lorca (1898-1936)

Impressions and Landscapes, Book of Poems,

Gypsy Ballads, Lament for the Death of a Bullfighter,

The Poet in New York, The Shoemaker's Wonderful Wife,

Love of Don Perlimplín and Belisa in His Garden,

Doña Rosita the Spinster, Blood Wedding, Yerma

Camilo Jose Cela (1916- )

The Family of Pascual Duarte, The Hive,

Mrs. Caldwell Speaks to Her Son,

San Camilo, Mazurka for Two Dead Men,

Genes, Gods and Tyrants

Ana Maria Matute (1926- )

Los Abel, Celebration in the Northwest,

The Lost Children, Soldiers Cry by Night,

First Memory in School of the Sun, The Trap,

Fireflies, The Heliotrope Wall and Other Stories
 
 

Latin American Literature

Octavio Paz (Mexico, 1914-98)

La Estación Violenta, Piedra de Sol,

Alternating Current, Configurations,

Early Poems: 1935-1955, Collected Poems, 1957-1987,

The Labyrinth of Solitude, The Other Mexico,

The Bow and the Lyre,

Children of the Mire: Modern Poetry from Romanticism to the Avant-Garde

Antonio Buero Vallejo (Mexico, 1916-2000)

Historia de una Escalera, Hoy es Fiesta,

En la Ardiente Obscuridad, Las Meninas,

El Concierto de San Ovidio, El Tragaluz,

El Sueño de la Razón, La Fundación,

La Doble Historia del Doctor Valmy

La Detonación, Caimán, Música Cercana,

Misión al Pueblo Desierto

Juan Rufo (Mexico, 1918-86)

The Burning Plain and Other Stories,

Pedro Páramo

Carlos Fuentes (Mexico, 1928- )

Cambio de Piel, Terra Nostra

Alejo Carpentier ( Cuba, 1904-80)

Ecue-Yamba-O, The Lost Steps, The Chase,

The Kingdom of This World, The War of Time,

Reasons of State, The Harp and the Shadow

Jose Lezama Lima (Cuba, 1912-1976)

Paradiso, Muerte de Narciso, Enemigo Rumor,

La Fijeza, Fragmentos a su Iman,

Bahia de la Habana

Guillermo Cabrera Infante (Cuba, 1929- )

En la Paz como en la Guerra, Tres Tristes Tigres ,

La Habana para un Infante Difunto,

Exorcismos de Estilo, Holy Smoke

Miguel Angel Asturias (Guatemala, 1899-1974)

The Legends of Guatemala, The President,

Banana Republic (trilogy), The Bejeweled Boy

Jose Eustasio Rivera (Colombia, 1889-1928)

The Vortex, Promised Land

Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Colombia, 1928- )

One Hundred Years of Solitude,

Love in the Time of Cholera,

Leaf Storm and Other Stories,

No One Writes to the Colonel and Other Stories,

The Autumn of the Patriarch,

The General in His Labyrinth,

Of Love and Other Demons,

News of a Kidnapping

Romulo Gallegos (Venezuela, 1884-1969)

Doña Bárbara, Cantaclaro, Canaíma,

La Brizna de Paja en el Viento

Cesar Vallejo (Peru, 1895-1938)

Heraldos Negros, Trilce, Tungsteno,

Poemas Humanos,

España, Aparta de mi este Cáliz

Jose Maria Arguedas (Peru, 1911-1969)

Agua, Jaguar Fiesta, Diamantes y Pedernales,

Los Ríos Profundos, Todas las Sangres,

El Zorro de Arriba y el Zorro de Abajo

Mario Vargas Llosa (Peru, 1936- )

The Time of the Hero, The Green House,

Conversation in the Cathedral, Making Waves

Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter, Death in the Andes,

The War of the End of the World,

The Notebooks of Don Rigoberto

Jose Ingenieros (Argentine, 1877-1925)

Las Fuerzas Morales, Ciencia y Educacion,

El Hombre Mediocre

Ricardo Guiraldes (Argentine, 1886-1927)

Don Segundo Sombra

Jorge Luis Borges (Argentine, 1899-1986)

Fervor de Buenos Aires, Luna de Enfrente,

Cuaderno San Martín, Dreamtigers,

A Personal Anthology, Inquisiciones,

Selected Nonfictions, The Book of Imaginary Beings,

Historia Universal de la Infamia,

Ficciones, El Aleph, Extraordinary Tales,

Dr. Brodie's Report, Labyrinths, Collected Fictions

Julio Cortazar (Argentine, 1914-84)

Hopscotch, End of the Game,

Sixty-two: A Model Kit,

All Fires the Fire and Other Stories,

A Change of Light and Other Stories

Adolfo Bioy Casares (Argentine, 1914-1999)

La Invención de Morel, Los que Aman Odian,

Una Muñeca Rusa, La Invención y la Trama,

El Lado de la Sombra, Un Campeón Desparejo,

Memorias, Una Magia Modesta

Horacio Quiroga (Uruguay, 1878-1937)

Tales of the Jungle, Anaconda, The Desert,

Tales of Love, Madness, and Death, Beyond

Juan Carlos Onetti (Uruguay, 1909-1994)

Para esta Noche, La Vida Breve, Los Adioses,

El Astillero, Juntacadáveres, Tiempo de Abrazar,

Dejemos Hablar al Viento, Cuando ya no Importe

Augusto Roa Bastos (Paraguay, 1917- )

Hijo de Hombre, Yo el Supremo,

El Trueno Entre las Hojas, El Baldío,

Madera Quemada, Los Pies Sobre el Agua,

Moriencia, Cuerpo Presente,

Contar un cuento y Otros Relatos,

Vigilia del Almirante, Contravida, Madama Sui

Gabriela Mistral (Chile, 1889-1957)

Sonnets of Death, Desolación, Tala, Lagar

Pablo Neruda (Chile, 1904-73)

Twilight Book, Twenty Love Poems and One Song of Despair,

Residence on Earth and Other Poems, Canto General,

Elementary Odes, Extravagaria, Toward the Splendid City

Isabel Allende (Chile, 1942- )

The House of Spirits, Of Love and Shadows,

Eva Luna, The Infinite Plan, Daughter of Fortune,

Portrait in Sepia
 
 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 









 

 

Other European Writers 
 

Sigmund Freud (Austria, 1856-1939)

On the Psychical Mechanism of Hysterical Phenomena,

Study on Hysteria, Dora

Thomas Mann (Germany, 1875-1955)

Buddenbrooks, Death in Venice,

Royal Highness, Mario and the Magician,

Stories of Three Decades, The Magic Mountain

Joseph and His Brothers, The Holy Sinner,

Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man

Adolph Hitler (Germany, 1889-1945)

Mein Kampf

Erich Maria Remarque (Germany-USA, 1897-1970)

All Quiet on the Western Front, The Way Back,

Three Comrades, Arch of Triumph,

A Time to Love and a Time to Die,

Shadows in Paradise

Bertolt Brecht (Germany, 1898-1956)

Baal, Drums in the Night, Man is Man,

Mother Courage and her Children,

The Good Woman of Setzuan, The Caucasian Chalk Circle

Heinrich Boll (Germany, 1917-1985)

Traveler, If You Come to Spa, Adam, Where Art Thou?,

Billiards at Half Past Nine, Acquainted with the Night,

Tomorrow and Yesterday, The Mad Dog,

The Clown, Absent without Leave, Irish Journal,

Group Portrait with Lady, Eighteen Stories,

Children Are Civilians Too

Franz Kafka (Czech Republic, 1883-1924)

The Trial, The Castle, The Judgment, The Metamorphosis,

A Country Doctor, In the Penal Colony, A Hunger Artist

Luigi Pirandello (Italy, 1867-1936)

The Late Mattia Pascal, The Young and the Old,

Right You Are If You Think You Are,

The Pleasure of Honesty, Six Characters in Search of an Author,

Henry IV, As You Desire Me

Grazia Deledda (Italy, 1871-1936)

After the Divorce, Elias Portolú, Flight into Egypt,

Ashes, Reeds in the Wind, The Mother.

Anatole France (France, 1844-1924)

Penguin Island, Sylvestre Bonnard’s Crime,

My Friend's Book, The Red Lily,

The Gods Are Athirst, The Revolt of the Angels

Henri Bergson (France, 1859-1941)

Time and Free Will, Matter and Memory,

Laughter, Introduction to Metaphysics,

Creative Evolution, The Creative Mind,

The Two Sources of Morality and Religion

Romain Rolland (France,1866-1944)

Beethoven, Michelangelo, Tolstoy,

Jean-Christophe, Above the Battle,

The Wolves, The Soul Enchanted,

Journey Within, Mémoires

Andre Gide (France, 1869-1951)

The Immoralist, Strait Is the Gate,

Lafcadio's Adventures, The Counterfeiters,

Prometheus Misbound, Travels in the Congo,

Retour du Tchad

Marcel Proust (France, 1871-1922)

Pleasures and Regrets, Remembrance of Things Past,

In Search of Lost Time, Swann's Way,

Within a Budding Grove, Jean Santeuil

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (France, 1900-1944)

Southern Mail, Night Flight, The Little Prince

Wind, Sand, and Stars, Flight to Arras,

Jean-Paul Sartre (France, 1905-80)

Nausea, Intimacy, The Flies, No Exit,

Being and Nothingness, The Age of Reason, The Reprieve

Troubled Sleep, The Respectful Prostitute,

Dirty Hands, The Devil and the Good Lord

Albert Camus (France, 1913-60)

The Myth of Sisyphus, The Stranger, Cross Purpose,

Caligula, The Rebel, The Plague, The Fall,

State of Siege, The Just Assassins

Claude Simon (France, 1913- )

The Trickster, The Wind, The Flanders Road,

Histoire, The World about Us, The Acacia

James Joyce (Ireland, 1882-1941)

Ulysses, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man,

Finnegans Wake

Samuel Beckett (Ireland, 1906-1989)

Murphy, Watt, Molloy, Malone Dies,

The Unnamable, How It Is, The Lost Ones,

Waiting for Godot, Endgame,

Krapp's Last Tape, Happy Days

Bertrand A. W. Russell (Britain, 1872-1970)

The Principles of Mathematics, Marriage and Morals

The Story of Western Philosophy

Virginia Woolf (Britain, 1882-1941)

The Waves, The Voyage Out, Night and Day,

Jacob's Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse,

Orlando, The Years, Between the Acts,

The Death of the Moth and Other Essays,

The Moment and Other Essays,

A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas

Agatha Christie (Britain, 1891-1976)

The Mysterious Affair at Styles, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd,

Murder on the Orient Express, Death on the Nile,

And Then There Were None, Death Comes as the End,

Funerals Are Fatal, The Pale Horse, Passenger to Frankfurt,

Elephants Can Remember and Curtain.

George Orwell (1903-1950)

Shooting an Elephant, A Hanging, Down and Out in Paris &

London, Burmese Days, Homage to Catalonia, Animal Farm.

Joanne Kathleen Rowling (Britain, 1966- )

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's / Sorcerer's Stone

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them

Quidditch Through The Ages

Wadysaw Stanisaw Reymont (Poland, 1867-1925)

The Comedienne, The Promised Land,

The Peasants

Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin (Russia, 1870-1953)

The Village, Dry Valley,

The Gentleman from San Francisco,

The Well of Days, Memories and Portraits,

Boris Leonidovich Pasternak (Russia, 1890-1960)

The Childhood of Lovers, Safe Conduct,

On Early Trains, The Terrestrial Expanse,

Doctor Zhivago

Mikhail Aleksandrovich Sholokhov (Russia, 1905-84)

The Silent Don, And Quiet Flows the Don,

The Don Flows Home to the Sea,

Virgin Soil Upturned, They Fought for Their Country,

Destiny of a Man

Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn (Russia, 1918- )

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich,

The First Circle, Cancer Ward, August 1914,

November 1916, Red Wheel (trilogy),

The Gulag Archipelago, The Oak and the Calf,

The Mortal Danger

Chingiz Aitmatov (Russia, 1928- )

White Rain, Tales of Mountains and Steppes,

Farewell, Gulsary!, Jamila, The White Ship,

The Ascent of Mt. Fuji, A Difficult Passage,

Face to Face, The First Teacher,

The Day Lasts More Than a Hundred Years

Julian Semyonov (Russia, 1931-1993)

Petrovka 35; Ogoreva, 6; Confrontation; Reporter;

No Password Needed; Tenderness; Third Card

Diamonds for the Dictatorship of the Proletariat;

Seventeen Moments of Spring;

The Order to Survive, Bomb for the Chairman
 
 

Other Contemporary Writers
 
 

Sir Rabindranath Tagore (India, 1861-1941)

Sadhana: The Realization of Life,

Gitanjali, The Gardener, The Crescent Moon,

Songs of Kabir, Cycle of Spring, Fireflies, Sheaves

Premchand (Dhanpat Rai Shrivastava) (India, 1880-1936)

The Road to Salvation

Natsume Soseki (Japan, 1867-1916)

I am a Cat, Heart, Light and Darkness

Higuchi Ichiyo (Japan, 1872-1896)

Child’s Play

Tanizaki Jun’ichiro (Japan, 1886-1965)

In Praise of Shadows

Yasunari Kawakawa (Japan, 1899-1972)

Snow Country, Thousand Cranes,

House of the Sleeping Beauties and Other Stories

Lu Xun (China, 1881-1936)

Diary of a Madman, Upstairs in a Wineshop,

Wild Grass

Gao Xingjian (China, 1940- )

The Other Shore, One Man’s Bible,

Return to Painting, Ink Paintings

Tawfiq Al-Hakim (Egypt, 1898-1989)

The Sultan’s Dilemma

Naguib Mahout (Egypt, 1911- )

Zaabalawi

Chinua Achebe (Nigeria, 1930- )

Things Fall Apart

Wole Soyinka (Nigeria, 1934- )

Death and the King’s Horsemen, Dance of the Forest,

The Swamp Dwellers, The Strong Breed, The Road,

The Bacchae of Euripides, Madmen and Specialists

 

Sources of Info About World Literature



http://www.online-literature.com/ (World Literature: The Literature Network. Books online)

http://www.encyclopedia.com/ (World Literature)

http://www.griffe.com/projects/worldlit/ (World Literature)

http://thinkers.net/ (World Literature)

http://www.lib.virginia.edu/wess/etexts.html (European Literature)

http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/ (English and American Literature)

http://www.bibliomania.com/2/3/270/frameset.html (American Literature)

http://www.americanliterature.com/MAIN.HTML (American Literature)

http://virtual-spain.com/literatura_espanola.html (Spanish Literature)

http://www.angelfire.com/id/ssims/antologiageneral.html (Latin American Literature)

http://www.sovlit.com/ (Russian Literature)

http://www.aasianst.org/EAA/wg-lit.htm (Oriental / Asian Literature)

http://www.cohums.ohio-state.edu/deall/jin.3/c231/refs/lit.htm (Chinese Literature)

http://mockingbird.creighton.edu/english/worldlit/wldocs/china.htm (Chinese Literature)

http://www.cs.colostate.edu/~malaiya/hindiint.html (Hindi Literature)

http://www.cs.colostate.edu/~malaiya/hindipoets.html (Hindi Authors)

http://mockingbird.creighton.edu/english/worldlit/wldocs/japan.htm (Japanese Literature)

http://www.lib.duke.edu/ias/eac/literature.html (Japanese Literature)

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/indiv/mideast/cuvlm/literatures.html (Middle East Literature)

http://www.library.cornell.edu/colldev/mideast/arablit.htm (Middle East Literature)

http://www.iupui.edu/~aaws/literature.htm (African Literature)

http://www-sul.stanford.edu/depts/ssrg/africa/lit.html (African Literature)

http://web.uflib.ufl.edu/cm/africana/writers.htm (African Writers)

For Authors' Biographies visit the Section "Biographies" in General References
 

AMERICAN HISTORY: LIST FOR BOOK REPORTS.

TITLES AND AUTHORS (Authors are listed chronologically by date of birth.)


First Nine Weeks (From Discovery to the Purchase of the Louisiana)

Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)

1732-1757-Poor Richard’s Almanac

1757-The Way to Wealth

Thomas Paine (1737-1809)

1776-Common Sense

Washington Irving (1783-1859)

1809-A History of New York

1820-The Sketch Book

1832-The Legends of the Alhambra

James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851)

1821-The Spy

1826-The Last of the Mohicans

1827-The Red Rover

1841-The Deerslayer

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)

1836-Nature

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)

1837-Twice-Told Tales

1846-Mossesfrom an Old Manse

1850-The Scarlet Letter

1851-House of the Seven Gables

1853-Tanglewood Tales

1860-The Marble Faun

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882)

1839-Voices of the Night

1839-Hyperion

1849-Kavanagh: a Tale

1855-The Song of Hiawatha

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)

1838-The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym

1840-Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque

1845-Tales

1845-The Raven and other Poems

 

Second Nine Weeks (Going West & the Civil War)

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896)

1852-Uncle Tom's Cabin

1859-The Minister's Wooing

1869-0ldtown Folks

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)

1854-Walden, or Life in the Woods

Frederick Douglass (1818-1895)

1845-Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave: Written by Himself

Herman Melville (1819-1891)

1846-Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life

1847-0moo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas

1851-Moby Dick; or, The Whale

Walt Whitman (1819-1892)

1842-Franklin Evans

1855-1892-Leaves of Grass

1871-Passage to India

1927-The Half-Breed and Other Stories

Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909)

1865-The Mall Without a Country

Emily Dickson (1830-1886)

1890-Poems

1914-The Single Hound

1931-Letters of Emily Dickson

1945-Bolts of Melody

Helen Hunt Jackson (1830-1885)

1884-Ramona, a Story

1885-A century of dishonor; a sketch of the United States Government's dealings with some of the Indian tribes

Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888)

1863-Hospital Sketches

1868-Little Women

1871-Little Men

1886-Jo's Boys

 

Third Nine Weeks (From 1880’s to 1939)
 

Horatio Alger (1832-1899)

1867-Ragged Dick, or Street Life in New York

1869-Luck and Pluck series

1871-Tattered Tom series

Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) (1835-1910)

1876-The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

1882-The Prince and the Pauper

1883-Life on the Mississippi

1884-The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1889-A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Bret Harte (1836-1902)

1867-Condensed Novels

1868-The Luck of Roaring Camp

William Dean Howells (1837-1920)

1882-A Modern Instance

1885-The Rise of Silas Lapham

1890-A Hazard of New Fortunes

Henry James (1843-1916)

1878-Daisy Miller

1881-The Portrait of a Lady

1886-The Bostonians

1898- The Turn of the Screw

1902-The Wings of the Dove

Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909)

1877-Deephaven

1896-The Country of the Pointed Firs

Kate Chopin (1851-1904)

1899-The Awakening

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915)

1900-Up From Slavery

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919)

1900-The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935)

1890-The Yellow Wallpaper

1910-What Diana Did

1916-With Her in Ourland

O. Henry (William Sidney Porter) (1862-1910)

1904-Cabbages and Kings

1906-The Gift of the Magi

1907-The Last Leaf

1908-The Voice of the City

Edith Wharton (1862-1937)

1905-The House of Mirth

1911-Ethan Frome

1920-The Age of Innocence

Booth Tarkington (1869-1946)

1914-Penrod

1916-Seventeen

1918-The Magnificent Ambersons

1921-Alice Adams

Stephen Crane (1871-1900)

1893-Maggie: A Girl of the Streets

1895-The Red Badge of Courage

1898-The Open Boat and Other Tales of Adventure

James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938)

1912-The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

Theodore Dreiser (1871-1945)

1900-Sister Carrie

1912-The Financier

1925-An American Tragedy

Willa Cather (1873-1947)

1913-0 Pioneers!

1918-My Antonia

1927 -Death Comes to the Archbishop

Ellen Glasgow (1874-1945)

1925-Barren Ground

1926-The Romantic Comedians

1941-In This Our Life

Gertrude Stein (1874-1946)

1914-Tender Buttons

1925-The Making of Americans

1933-The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas

Jack London (1876-1916)

1903-The Call of the Wild

1904-The Sea Wolf

1906-White Fang

Sherwood Anderson (1876-1941)

1919-Winesburg, Ohio

1921-The Trillmph of the Egg

Carl Sandburg (1878-1967)

1926-Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years

1939-Abraham Lincoln: The War Years

Upton Sinclair (1878-1968)

1906-The Jungle

1917-King Coal

1934-Dragon's Teeth

Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951)

1920-Main Street

1922-Babbitt

1925-Arrowsmith

1927-Elmer Gantry

1935-It Can't Happen Here

Edna Ferber (1887-1968)

1924-So Big

1930-Cimarron

1952-Giant

Henry Heston (1888-1968)

1928-The Outermost House

T.S. Elliot (1888-1965)

1922-The Waste Land

Eugene O’Neill (1888-1953)

1916-Before Breakfast

1920-Beyond the Horizon

1922-The Dreamy Kid

1926-The Great God Brown

1956-Long Day’s Journey Into Night

Erle Stanley Gardener (1889-1970)

1932-The Case Velvet Claws

More than 75 novels with Perry Mason

Katherine Anne Porter (1890-1980)

1930-Flowering Judas

1939-Pale Horse, Pale Rider

1962-Ship of Fools

Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960)

1934-Jonah's Gourd Vine

1937-Their Eyes Were Watching God

Henry Miller (1891-1980)

1934-Tropic of Cancer

1939-Tropic of Capricorn

Pearl S. Buck (1892-1973)

1931- The Good Earth

James Thurber (1894-1961)

1940-Fables for Our Time

1942-My World and Welcome to It

1943-Men, Women and Dogs

Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961)

1929-Red Harvest

1930-The Maltese Falcon

1931-The Glass Key

1932-The Thin Man

Jean Toomer (1894-1967)

1923-Cane

F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940)

1920-This Side of Paradise

1925-The Great Gatsby

1934-Tender Is the Night

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (1896-1953)

1938-The Yearling

John Dos Passos (1896-1970)

1921-Three Soldiers

1925-Manhattan Transfer

1930-1937-U.S.A. (trilogy)

1936-Big Money

1939-1949-District of Columbia (trilogy)

1941-The Ground We Stand

1951-Chosen Country

1966-The Best Times

William Faulkner (1897-1962)

1929-The Sound and the Fury

1932-Light in August

1936-Absalom, Absalom!

Thornton Wilder (1897-1975)

1927-The Bridge of San Luis Rey

1967-The Eighth Day

1973-Theophilus North

Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961)

1926-The Sun Also Rises

1929-A Farewell to Arms

1940-For Whom the Bell Tolls

1952-The Old Man and the Sea

E.B. White (1899-1985)

1945-Stuart Little

1952-Charlotte's Web

Janet Lewis (1899-1998)

1941-The Wife of Martin Guere

Thomas Wolfe (1900-1938)

1925-Look Homeward Angel

1935-0f1ime and the River

1940-You Can't Go Home Again

Laura Z. Hobson (1900-l986)

1947-Gentleman's Agreement

Margaret Mitchell (19O0-1949)

1936-Gone with the Wind

John Steinbeck (1902-1968)

1937-0f Mice and Men

1939-The Grapes of Wrath

1945-Cannery Row

1947-The Pearl

1952-East of Eden

Arna Bontemps (1902-1973)

1935-BLack Thunder

1939-Dreams at Dusk

Erskine Caldwell (1903-1987)

1932-Tobacco Road

1933-God's Little Acre

Nathaniel West (1904-1940)

1933-Miss Lonely-Hearts

1939- The Day of the Locust

Dr. Seuss (Theodore Seuss Geisel) (1904-1991) 

1937-And To Think I Saw it on Mulberry Street

1957-The Cat in the Hat

John O'Hara (1905-1970)

1934-Appointment in Samarra

1935-Butterfield 8

1940-Pal Joey

Robert Penn Warren (1905-1989)

1939-Night Rider

1947-All the King's Men

William Saroyan (1906-1981 )

1934-The Daring Young Man on the Flying Trapeze

1942-The Human Comedy

Henry Roth (1906-1995)

1934-Call It Sleep
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 














































 

Fourth Nine Weeks (From 1939-Today)
 

Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906-2001 )

1955-Gift from the Sea

Robert Heinlein (1907-1988)

1961-Stranger in a Strange Land

Dorothy West (1907-1998)

1948-The Living is Easy

1995-The Wedding

James Michener (1907-1997 )

1947-Tales of the South Pacific

1959-Hawaii

1965-The Source

Richard Wright (1908-1960)

1940-Native Son

1945-Black Boy

James Agee (1909-1955)

1941-Let Us Now Praise Famous Men

1957-A Death in the Family

Wallace Stegner (1909-1993)

1943-The Big Rock Candy Mountain

1971-Angle of Repose

1976-The Spectator Bird

Eudora Welty (1909-2001)

1942-The Robber Bridegroom

1972-The Optimist's Daughter

Paul Bowles (1910-1999 )

1949-The Sheltering Sky

1950-The Delicate Prey and Other Stories

John Cheever (1912-1982)

1957-The Wapshot Chronicle

1960-Bullet Park

1977-Falconer

1978-The Stories of John Cheever

Mary McCarthy (1912-1989)

1952-The Groves of Academe

1957-Memoirs of a Catholic Girlhood

1963-The Group

Bernard Malamud (1914-1986)

1952-The Natural

1957-The Assistant

1958-The Magic Barrel

1966-The Fixer

John Hersey (1914-1993)

1944-A Bell for Adano

1946-Hiroshima

Ralph Ellison (1914-1994)

1952-Invisible Man

William Burroughs (1914-1997)

1959-Naked Lunch

Tennessee Williams (1914-1983)

1939-American Blues

1947-A Streetcar Named Desire

1955-Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

1959-Sweet Bird of Youth

Saul Bellow (1915-2005)

1959-Henderson the Rain King

1964-Herzog

1975-Humboldt's Gift

Arthur Miller (1915-2005)

1949-Death of a Salesman

1953-The Crucible

Herman Wouk (1915- )

1951-The Caine Mutiny

1955-Marjorie Morningstar

1962-Youngblood Hawke

Carson McCullers (1917-1967)

1940-The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter

1941-Rejlections in a Golden Eye

1946-Member of the Wedding

1951-The Ballad of the Sad Café

Shirley Jackson (1919-1965)

1948-The Road Through the Wall

1949-The Lottery

1962-We Have Always Lived in the Castle

J.D. Salinger (1919- )

1951-The Catcher in the Rye

1961-Franny and Zooey

Isaac Asimov (1920-1992)

1950-I, Robot

1954-The Caves of Steel

1951-53-The Foundation Trilogy

Ray Bradbury (1920- )

1950-The Martian Chronicles

1953-Fahrenheit 451

1962-Something Wicked This Way Comes

Alex Haley (1921-1992)

1964-Autobiography of Malcolm X

1976-Roots

James Jones (1921-1977)

1951-From Here to Eternity

1957-Some Came Running

1962-The Thin Red Line

Jack Kerouac (1922-1969)

1957-0n the Road

William Gaddis (1922-1998)

1955-The Recognitions

1975-J R

1985-Carpenter's Gothic

Kurt Vonnegut (1922- )

1963-Cat 's Cradle

1969-Slaughterhouse-Five

1973-Breakfast of Champions.

Joseph Heller (1923-1999)

1962-Catch 22

1979-Good as Gold

Norman Mailer (1923- )

1948-The Naked and the Dead

1979-The Executioner's Song

Truman Capote (1924-1984)

1948-0ther Voices, Other Rooms

1958-Breakfast at Tiffany's

1965-ln Cold Blood

James Baldwin (1924-1987)

1953-Go Tell It on the Mountain

1955-Notes of a Native Son

I 961-Nobody Knows My Name

1962-Another Country

Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964)

1955-A Good Man Is Hard to Find

1960-The Violent Bear it Away

1965-Everything That Rises Must Converge

1978-Letters

William Styron (1925- )

1951-Lie Down in Darkness

1967-The Confessions of Nat Turner

1979-Sophie's Choice

Harper Lee (1926- )

1960-To Kill a Mockingbird

Alice Adams (1926- )

1984-Superior Women

1989-After You've Gone

Maya Angelou (1928- )

1970-I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

William Kennedy (1928- )

1983-Ironweed

Harold Brodkey (1930-1996)

1958-First Love and Other Sorrows

1988-Stories in an Almost Classical Mode

John Barth (1930- )

1960-The Sot-Weed Factor

1971-Chimera

Donald Barthelme (1931-1989)

1964-Come Back Dr. Caligari

1981-Sixty Stories

E.L. Doctorow (1931- ) 

1975-Ragtime

1980-Loon Lake

1986-World's Fair

1989-Billy Bathgate

Toni Morrison (1931- )

1970-The Bluest Eye

1977-Song of Solomon

1981-Tar Baby

1987-Beloved

Tom Wolfe (1931- )

1965-The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby

1968-The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

1987-The Bonfire of the Vanities

Sylvia Plath (1932-1963)

1963-The Bell Jar

John Updike (1932- )

1959-Poorhouse Fair

1960-Rabbit Run

1963-The Centaur

1970-Bech: A Book

1981-Rabbit Is Rich

1990-Rabbit at Rest

Philip Roth (1933- ) 

1959-Goodbye, Columbus

1962-Letting Go

1969-Portnoy's Complaint

Joan Didion (1934- )

1970-Play It As It Lays

1977-A Book of Common Prayer

Ken Kesey (1935-2001)

1962-0ne Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

1964-Sometimes a Great Notion

Eldridge Lleaver (1935-1998)

1968-Soul on Ice

Thomas Pynchon (1937- )

1963-V.

1967-The Crying of Lot 49

1973-Gravity's Rainbow

Raymond Carver (1938-1989)

1976-Will You Be Quiet Please?

1983-Cathedral

1988-Where I'm Calling From

Joyce Carol Oates (1938- ) 

1978-Son of the Morning

1980-Bellefleur

1985-Solstice

Bobbie Ann Mason (1940- )

1982-Shiloh and Other Stories

1985-ln Country

Paul Theroux (1941- )

1982-Mosquito Coast

Anne Tyler (1941- )

1982-Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant

1985-The Accidental Tourist

1989-Breathing Lessons

John Irving (1942- )

1978- The World According to Garp

1981-The Hotel New Hampshire

1985-The Cider House Rules

1989-A Prayer for Owen Meany

1998-A Widow for One Year

Frederick Barthelme (1943- )

1990-Naturai Selection

Alice Walker (1944- )

1982- The Color Purple

1988-The Temple of My Familiar

Ann Beattie (1947- ) 

1976-Chilly Scenes of Winter

1980-Failing in Place

1986-Where You'll Find Me

Stephen King (1947- )

1975-Salem's Lot

1977-The Shining

1978-The Stand

1979-The Long Walk

1980-Firestarter

1981-Cujo

1982-The Running Man

1983-Pet Sematary

1984-Thinner

1984-The Talisman

1986-It

1987-The Eyes of the Dragon

1991-Needful Things

1994-Insomnia

1995-Rose Madder

1996-Desperation

1998-Bag of Bones

2000-The Green Mile

2001-Dreamcatcher

2001-Black House

 

Tom Clancy (1947- )

1984-The Hunt for Red October

1986-Red Storm Rising

1987-Patriot Games

1988-The Cardinal of the Kremlin

1989-Clear and Present Danger

1991-The Sum of All Fears

1993-Without Remorse

1994-Debt of Honor

1996-Executive Orders

1997-Into the Storm

1998-Rainbow Six

2000-The Bear and the Dragon

2002-Red Rabbit

2003-The Teeth of the Tiger

Mary Gordon (1950- )

1978-Final Payments

1985-Men and Angels

Louise Erdich (1951-)

1984-Love Medicine

1996- Tales of Burning Love

Amy Tan (1952- )

1989-The Joy Luck Club

1991-The Kitchen God

John Grisham (1955- )

1989-A Time to Kill

1991-The Firm

1992-The Pelican Brief

1993-The Client

1994-The Chamber

1995-The Rainmaker

1996-The Runaway Jury

1997-The Partner

1998-The Street Lawyer

1999-The Testament

2000-The Brethren

2001-The Painted House

2002-The Summons

2003-The King of Torts

2004-The Last Juror

2005-The Broker

2006-The Innocent Man

BOOK REPORT FORM

Student Name:

Team:

1-Book Title:

2-When was it written? 2.1-Country 2.2-Historical Background (2 points)

3-Author:

3.1-Author’s Biography ( http://home.comcast.net/~cardi55/general_references.htm ): (2 points)

4-Describe the content / plot of the book (At least five paragraphs, describing  main topics and events at the beginning, the middle and at the end of the book: what, when, where, how): (4 points)

5-Classify the main characters in the book as positive or negative, characterize their attitudes, and explain why you evaluate them in that way.
 (2 points)
5.1-Good Guys:
5.2-Bad Guys:

6-Identify the main idea and moral messages in this book. Author's purpose. (2 points)

7-How could you apply those messages to your everyday life. Give examples. (1 point)

8-According to your point of view, why the key event described in the book happened. Explain possible reasons and / or causes. (2 points)

9-What particular period / unit / topic studied in class is related to the content of this book?  (1 point)

10-Suggest a different ending for the book or a way to improve it. What would be necessary to change in the book to achieve that? (2 points)

11-Evaluate the pros and cons, rights and wrongs with regard to the quality / values of this book.(2 points)

Final Grade: 20-18= A; 17-16= B; 15-14= C; 13-12= D

 This form may be useful to summarize the book:

 

12-Special Assignments for Economics & Government / 

Actividades Academicas Especiales sobre Economia y Gobierno
(Click on the title to go back to the table of contents)

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

1-READING / WRITING: …..............................................................................................................20% Grade

1.1-First & Second Nine Weeks: Current Events (Articles from Newsweek & Time Magazine): Homework. --72 entries, 4 per week.

--Summarize article + content studied in class + personal opinion. Add a copy of the article.

-Individual responsibility. No works alike will be accepted. No grade for any of them.

2-QUIZZES: Lectures + Textbook Chapter + Videos Series "The Constitution".......................….30% Grade

3-PROJECTS.........................................................................................................................................30% Grade

- A Political Campaign (Using Cartoons and Real Info about Real People)................SEPT

-Congress.........................................................................................................................OCT

-State & Local Government (Florida / Miami)...............................................................NOV

(By Teams, Poster Boards, Graphs / Tables, Pictures / Photos are required). See Rubric.

4-VIDEO ANALYSIS (5 movies).........................................................................................................20% Grade

5-EXAM

 

ECONOMICS:

1.1-RESEARCH: ...............................................................................................................20% Grade

-12 BUSINESSMEN / ECONOMISTS BIOGRAPHIES (1 page each) (4 per week: 1st. - 3rd. week)

-12 BIG CORPORATION PROFILES (2 pages each) (4 per week: 4th. - 6th. week)

-THE STOCK MARKET GAME (Showing Trade & Gains): Including Account Summary & Holdings. -The Stock Market Game (Three Reports).....individual assignment (I will explain in class. See Stocks Quest and take the tour at http://investsmart.coe.uga.edu/C001759/stocksquest/mystocks.htm

(Individual responsibility. No works alike will be accepted: No grade for any of them.).

1.2-READING/ WRITING:...............................................................................................20% Grade

Weeks without Stock Market Reports or Projects, after 6th. week: Current Events (Articles from Newsweek, Time, and Fortune Magazine): Homework. --72 entries, 4 per week.

--Summarize article + content studied in class + personal opinion. Add a copy of the article.

-Individual responsibility. No works alike will be accepted. No grade for any of them.

3-QUIZZES (ECONOMICS IN ACTION and ECONOMICS U$A):
Lecture + Textbook Chapter + Video Program....................................................................20% Grade

4-PROJECTS:.........................................................................................................................25% Grade

-Economy of the United States..........................team assignment

-European Economy...........................................team assignment

Requirements (See Rubric):

5-VIDEO ANALYSIS (5 movies)..............................................................................................15% Grade

6-FINAL EXAM


 SOME MAJOR AMERICAN CORPORATIONS

1-IBM .................................................................................40-MC GRAW - HILL

2-ATT .................................................................................41-LOCKHEED / MC DONNELL DOUGLAS

3-MCI .................................................................................42-WELLS FARGO

4-SPRING ..........................................................................43-UNION CARBIDE

5-MICROSOFT .................................................................44-BOEING

6-APPLE .............................................................................45-SEAGRAM

7-ORACLE......................................................................... 46-ANHEUSER - BUSCH

8-INTEL ..............................................................................47-DU PONT

9-CHASE / SHELL ............................................................48-GOODRICH

10-GENERAL ELECTRIC .................................................49-SHERWIN - WILLIAMS

11-CITIBANK .....................................................................50-MOTOROLA

12-GENERAL MOTORS ...................................................51-TEXAS INSTRUMENTS

13-FORD ..............................................................................52-KRAFT

14-CHRYSLER ....................................................................53-SARA LEE

15- BANK OF AMERICA...................................................54-BORDEN

16-DISNEY ............................................................................55-GENERAL MILLS

17-COCA-COLA ..................................................................56-HERSHEY

18-PEPSI ................................................................................57-GERBER

19-MAC DONALD'S .............................................................58-BLACK & DECKER

20-PROCTOR & GAMBLE ................................................59-CRANE

21-HOME DEPOT ..................................................................60-COLEMAN

22-PIZZA HUT ........................................................................61-GILLETTE

23-BLOCKBUSTER ...............................................................62-EXXON

24-HEINZ .................................................................................63-MOBIL

25-WESTINGHOUSE ............................................................64-TEXACO

26-TIME ...................................................................................65-CHEVRON

27-KELLOG’S .........................................................................66-AMOCO

28-NESTLE ...............................................................................67-PENNZOIL

29-LIBBY’S ..............................................................................68-GOODYEAR

30-HEWLETT-PACKARD .....................................................69-KODAK

31-SHURFINE ..........................................................................70-COLGATE - PALMOLIVE

32-AMERICAN AIRLINES .....................................................71-AVON

33-UPS .......................................................................................72-REVLON

34-SIMON & SCHUSTER .....................................................73-PHILIP MORRIS

35-BELL & HOWELL .............................................................74-NABISCO

36-RAND McNALLY ...............................................................75-MATTEL

37-HAMMOND .........................................................................76-BACARDI

38-JOHNSON & JOHNSON .................................................77-NEW YORK TIMES

39-KNIGHT - RIDDER .............................................................78-WASHINGTON POST
 
 
SOME OUTSTANDING WORLD ECONOMISTS & AMERICAN ENTREPRENEURS.

Economists:

1-ADAM SMITH (1723-90): British economist and philosopher. The Wealth of Nations.

2-KARL MARX (1818-83): German philosopher and economist. Das Kapital.

3-THOMAS MALTHUS (1766-1834): British economist and priest. An Essay on the Principle of Population.

4-JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES (1883-1946): British economist. The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money.

5-MILTON FRIEDMAN (1912-2006): American economist. Capitalism and Freedom. Dollars and Deficit. Free to Choose.

6-JOHN KENNETH GALBRAITH (1908-2006): American economist. American Capitalism. The Affluent Society.

7-DAVID RICARDO (1772-1823): British economist.

8-JOHN STUART MILL (1806-1873): British philosopher and economist. Principles of Political Economy.

9-ALFRED MARSHALL (1842-1924): British economist. Principles of Economics.

10-IRVING FISHER (1867-1947): American economist. The Purchasing Power of Money. The Nature of Capital and Income. Elementary Principles of Economics.
 
 

Businessmen:

11-MICHAEL BLOOMBERG (1942- ): MEDIA

12-ANDREW CARNEGIE (1835-1919): STEEL

13-PIERRE SAMUEL DU PONT (?): CHEMICALS

14-WALTER PERCY CHRYSLER (1875-1940): CARS

15-WILLIAM FARGO (1818-1881): TRANSP. / SECURITY / CREDIT

16-HARVEY SAMUEL FIRESTONE (1868-1938): TIRES

17-HENRY FORD (1863-1947): CARS

18-ANDREW WILLIAM MELLON (1855-1937): BANKING

19-ABIGAIL JOHNSON (1962- ): MUTUAL FUNDS

20-JOHN ROCKEFELLER (1839-1937): OIL

21-CORNELIUS VANDERBILT (1843-99): RAILROADS

22-FRANK WINFIELD WOOLWORTH (1852-1919): RETAIL STORES

23-WILLIAM GATES III (1956- ): COMPUTERS / SOFTWARE

24-CHARLES SCHWAB (1937- ): STOCK MARKET

25-RALPH LAUREN (1939- ): FASHIONS

26-MICHAEL EISNER (1942- ): DISNEY

27-JOHN KLUGE ( 1914- ): MEDIA

28-ROBERTO GOIZUETA (1931- ): COKE

29-GEORGE LUCAS (1944- ): HOLLYWOOD

30-DONALD TRUMP (1946- ): REAL ESTATE, CASINOS

31-WARREN BUFFET (1930- ): INVESTMENTS

32-BERNARD MARCUS (1929- ): HARDWARE RETAIL STORES
 
 
GUIDE FOR PROJECTS: WORLD ECONOMY

CHOOSE FIVE (5) KEY COUNTRIES IN EACH REGION (REPRESENTATIVE EXAMPLES) & DESCRIBE THEIR SITUATION CONSIDERING THE FOLLOWING INDICATORS:

1-TERRITORY

2-NATURAL RESOURCES

3-ENERGETIC RESOURCES (OIL, ATOMIC POWER, HYDROELECTRIC )

4-POPULATION

5-PREDOMINANT ECONOMIC SECTOR

6-STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT OF CAPITALISM

7-TRADE: EXPORTS / IMPORTS (MAJOR COMMODITIES) TRADE BALANCE.

8-ECONOMIC & SOCIAL INDICATORS: GNP, GDP, GNP PER CAPITA, H. D. I. RANK, G. D. I.  RANK.

9-MAJOR CORPORATIONS

10-FOREIGN DEBT
 

SOURCES OF INFORMATION FOR PROJECTS
(SEE MY WEB PAGE)

1-UNITED NATIONS STATISTICAL YEARBOOK

2-UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIC AGENCIES & OTHER GLOBAL ECONOMIC RELATED ON-LINE SITES:

WWW.UN.ORG/ECOSOCDEV

WWW.WORLDBANK.ORG

WWW.APPS.FAO.ORG

WWW.WTO.ORG

WWW.ODCI.GOV/CIA/PUBLICATIONS/HES/INDEX

WWW.ARME.CORNELL.EDU/ECONINFO

3-ATLASES: ECONOMIC SECTION. GRAPHS & TABLES.

4-ENCYCLOPEDIAS: CONTINENTS / REGIONS.

5-WORLD ALMANAC.

6-THE NEW GLOBAL ORDER. A WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY, BY MICHAEL BRANDSHAW. MC GRAW-HILL, 1997. ISBN 0-697-21692-6
 
 

GUIDE TO PREPARE THE CORPORATION PROFILES (Use FORTUNE 500, Corp. Web Site, and Research on each Corp.)
 
1-HISTORY & LEADERSHIP: FOUNDATION (WHO, WHEN, WHERE), FIELD (s), CHANGES & MERGES, PRESENT LEADERS.

2-SALES

3-PROFITS

4-ASSETS

5-SHARES / STOCKS

6-EMPLOYEES

NOTE: FOR EACH INDICATOR COMPARE at lest 2-3 YEARS. USE GRAPHS OR TABLES.
 
  
 

13-RECOMMENDED SOFTWARE & VIDEO PROGRAMS


CD ROMs Y PROGRAMAS DE VIDEO RECOMENDADOS
(Click on the title to go back to the table of contents)

Company
Product
Information

1-Zane Publishing & CLEARVUE/eav.

PowerCD Series: European History, World History Through Art, World History Through Literature, American History, History of Literature and Art. Multimedia presentations w/ closed captions (cc). http://www.zane.com/zane_software_titles.html

1950 Stemmans, Suite 4044, Dallas, TX. 75207-3109 Ph. # 1-800-769 3723 or 1-214-746 5510 (Ask for a Catalog)

2-National Geographic Society

NGS PictureShow Series: World History and American History. Multimedia presentations w/ closed captions (cc) and bilingual (English & Spanish). http://www.glencoe.com/media_tech_catalog/whc_ngs_multi.html#show

Washington, D.C. 20036 Ph. # 1-800-368 2728 or 1-800-342 4460. (Ask for a Catalog)

3- CounterTop Software, MultiEducator, Inc. 

TOPICS Series: World and American History, Art, Great Museums, etc. Top Picks for your PC.

Redmond, WA. Ph. # 1-914- 235- 4340

4-Piranha Interactive Publishing

Ancient Origins: Ancient History. Great multimedia presentations about every region , culture, and period.

1839 West Drake, Suite B, Tempe, Az 85283. Ph. # 1-602-491 0500 

5-The Annenberg Foundation / CPB

The Western Tradition. A comprehensive video series of 52 programs (half hour each) covering every major topic in World History (cc). Subscribe to the website: http://www.learner.org/resources/series58.html  and watch the videos online, on-demand, free (Great !!).

P.O. Box 2345, S. Burlington, VT. 05407-2345. Ph # 1-800-532 7637. (Ask for a Catalog)

6-The Annenberg Foundation / OPB

Bridging World History. A thematic video series of 26 programs (half hour each) showing the patterns, connections and processes in world history (cc). Subscribe to the website: http://www.learner.org/resources/series197.html#program_descriptions and watch the videos online, on-demand, free (Great !!).

P.O. Box 2345, S. Burlington, VT. 05407-2345. Ph # 1-800-532 7637. (Ask for a Catalog)

7-Reader's Digest

Great Wonders of the World. Three hours of man and nature unique creations. Twenty-one (21) documentaries (10 minutes each) in three video tapes covering the most important places in human history. Available in English (cc) and Spanish.

Questar, Inc. P.O. Box 11345, Chicago, Il 60611. Order No. QV8002. Customer Service: 1-800-544 8422

8-The Annenberg Foundation / CPB

Art of the Western World. A video series of 9 programs (1 hour each) (cc). Subscribe to the website: http://www.learner.org/resources/series1.html and watch the videos online, on-demand, free (Great !!).

P.O. Box 2345, S. Burlington, VT. 05407-2345. Ph # 1-800-532 7637

9-The Annenberg Foundation / CPB

A Biography of America. A comprehensive video series of 26 programs covering every major topic in American History (30 mins. each) (cc). Subscribe to the website: http://www.learner.org/resources/series123.html and watch the videos online, on-demand, free (Great !!).

P.O. Box 2345, S. Burlington, VT. 05407-2345. Ph # 1-800-532 7637

10-Video Knowledge, Inc.

American History. A video series of 8 tapes covering the major topics in American History in Spanish (1 hour each).

29 Bramble Lane, Melville, New York 11747, Ph # 1-516-367-4250

11-GLENCOE / GTV

The American People. Video Disc covering the history of immigration, ethnic diversity, and minority groups in America. Bilingual (English & Spanish)

Glencoe / Mcgraw-Hill 1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020

12-ABC News / The History Channel

The Century. America's Time. A video series of 15 programs (45 mins each) covering the History of the US during the 20th Century (cc).

Buena Vista Home Entertainment, Dept. CS, Burbank, California 91521 

13-GLENCOE / The Nightly Business Report

Economics in Action. A comprehensive video series of 30 programs (10 mins each) covering every major topics in Economics. Bilingual (English & Spanish)

Glencoe / Mcgraw-Hill 1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020 

14-The Annenberg Foundation / CPB

Economics U$A. A comprehensive video series of 28 programs (half hour each) covering every major topic in Economics.

P.O. Box 2345, S. Burlington, VT. 05407-2345. Ph # 1-800-532 7637

15-The Annenberg Foundation / CPB

Inside the Global Economy. A comprehensive video series of 13 programs (one hour each) covering every major topic in Macro Economics.

P.O. Box 2345, S. Burlington, VT. 05407-2345. Ph # 1-800-532 7637

16-GENCLOE / ABC News

The Constitution. Three (3) video discs: The Powers of Congress, The Powers of the President, and The Powers of the Supreme Court (6 hours). Bilingual (English & Spanish).

Glencoe / Mcgraw-Hill 1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020 

17- The Annenberg Foundation / CPB

The Constitution: That Delicate Balance. A video series of 13 (one hour each) programs covering many controversial issues about the American government.

P.O. Box 2345, S. Burlington, VT. 05407-2345. Ph # 1-800-532 7637

18-CNN / Warner Home Video

Millennium : A panoramic sweep over the last 1,000 years of world history in 5 tapes and 10, one-hour episodes. (cc).

Warner Home Video, 4000 Warner Boulevard, Burbank, CA, 91522

19-A&E Television Networks

Biography of the Millennium: 100 People, 1000 Years in 4 tapes, 200 minutes.

New Video Group, 126 Fifth Ave. New York, NY, 10011.

20-Schlessinger Media, a division of Library Media Co.

Several series in DVDs and VHS for World History, American History, Government and Economics. DVDs have sound tracks in English and Spanish; VHSs have closed captions in English. Some programs are 30 mins. and some are 50 mins. long.

Library Video Company
P.O. Box 580
Wynnewood, PA 19096
PH # 1-800-843-3620 or 610-645-4000 Fax #  610-645-4040.

Please, check the web sites designed to support very good video mini-series on historical periods / events at http://home.comcast.net/~cardi55/world_history.htm
 

Recommended Books for High School History Teachers

Diamond, J. (1997). Guns, germs, and steel. New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Fukuyama, F. (1992). The end of history and the last man. New York, NY: Avon Books, Inc.

Hardt, M & Negri, A. (2001). Empire. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Huntington, S. P. (1998). The clash of civilizations and the remaking of world order. New York, NY: Touchstone, Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Kennedy, P. (1994). Preparing for the twenty-first century. New York, NY: Vintage Books Edition, Random House, Inc.

Kuper, A. & Kuper, J. (1996). The social science encyclopedia. New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.

Lerner, G. (1997). Why history matters. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, Inc.

Loewen, J.W. (1995). Lies my teacher told me. Everything your American history teacher textbook got wrong. New York, NY: Touchstone, Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Massialas, B. G. & Allen, R. F. (1996). Crucial issues in teaching social studies K-12. Florida State University. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., a division of International Thomson Publishing Co.

Maybury-Lewis, D. (1992). Millennium. Tribal wisdom and the modern world. New York, NY: Viking, Penguin Books USA, Inc.

Mearsheimer, J. (2003). The tragedy of great power politics. New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Rieff, D. (2002). A bed for the night. New York, NY: Touchstone, Simon & Schuster, Inc. 

Schott, J. C. & Singleton, L. R. (1996). Teaching the social sciences and history in secondary schools. A method book. Social Science Education Consortium, Inc. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., an International Thomson Publishing Co.

Shaver, J. P. (1991). Handbook of research on social studies teaching and learning. A project of the National Council for the Social Studies. New York, NY: Macmillan Publishing Co.

Wilson, Virginia & Litle, James (1993). Teaching Social Studies: Handbook of Trends, Issues, and Implications for the Future. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

16-BILINGUAL COURSES / CURSOS BILINGUES
INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES / METODOS DE ENSEÑANZA
(Click on the title to go back to the table of contents)

Bilingual Education and Academic Achievement of Hispanic Students in Inner-City High Schools.

(YOU CAN TRANSLATE THIS PAPER FROM ENGLISH TO ANY LANGUAGE. CLICK ON THE DIAMOND)



By Carlos J. Díaz
 
 

Introduction

Linguistic diversity has always been present in North America since it was settled

by the Native Americans thousands of years ago. More than 300 different languages

were spoken in this land before the Europeans’ arrival. At the time of the first

census in 1790, French, Spanish, Irish, Dutch, Swedish, and Welsh were well

represented in the young nation. Later immigrants also brought their languages

with them. German Americans accounted for 8.6 percent of the total population.

They created schools and newspapers in their communities to keep their home

language during several generations (Crawford, 1995). However, and even though

the first amendment of the Constitution guarantees freedom of speech to all

Americans, for more than two centuries assimilation theories ruled the lives of

million of immigrants and led to language submersion programs. Many saw foreign

languages as a “deficit” or “sign of retardation” or “a symptom of inferiority”.
 
 

Today, bilingualism is not longer considered a handicap to cognitive growth, but

probably an advantage, as a job skill of increasing importance, a tool of

cross-cultural understanding, and a vital resource in the global marketplace and

international relations (August & Hakuta, 1997).
 
 

However, on the one hand, society prevalent views of bilingual education

programs would not consider the development of the native language by virtue of its

usage in instruction. The home / first language is seen only as instrumental insofar

as it is helpful in the acquisition of English proficiency and helps students to keep

pace with the learning of academic content matter while they acquire sufficient skills

in English (Hakuta, 1990). On the other hand, many politicians, researchers,

administrators, and teachers consider that bilingual education “just doesn’t work”.

Some critics claim that it delays exposure to English, is one of the major causes of

Hispanic dropout rate, promotes immigrants’ resistance to learn English, and

fosters divisiveness (Krashen, 1998; Porter, 1996; Porter, 1990; Rossell & Baker,

1996).
 
 

Miami is a Hispanic enclave. Here, Hispanic students did not represent a

language minority, but a large majority. For us, bilingual education is not a political

issue, because being bilingual here is an economic and social necessity. It is beyond

the sentimental or the cultural effort to maintain our roots.
 
 

The Problem
 
 

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of bilingual education on the

academic achievement of Hispanic students in inner-city high schools. Bilingual

education is defined as the use of two languages for instruction, English and native

language (in this case Spanish).
 
 

Review of Related Literature

I-Advantages

No single definition of bilingualism is broad enough to cover all instances of

individuals who are called “bilingual”. The range can be from native-like control of

two or more languages to possessing minimal communicative skills in a second

language. Students in bilingual education programs are in the beginning stages of

bilingual development (Hakuta, 1990).
 
 

Research suggests that bilingualism brings with it several cognitive advantages,

including heightened cognitive flexibility and a greater ability to analyze language.

However, full bilingual programs in which the goal is full oral proficiency in both

languages are rare (McCown & Roop, 1992). The higher the bilingual proficiency,

the higher the academic achievement (Lindholm & Aclan, 1991). One study carried

out in several high schools showed that students who had bilingual education were

significantly less likely to dropout (23.5 versus 43%) than those who not had access

to bilingual education (Curiel, Rosenthal, & Richek, 1986). Bilingual education

encourages “minority” status students to take pride in their backgrounds and to

improve their self-esteem. Low self-esteem is a social phenomenon affecting a sizable

percentage of minority children. It is a syndrome of disempowerment and

alienation, exacerbated -if not created- by school experiences such as insensitivity

and low expectations by teachers (Cummins, 1989). Comparisons of bilingual and

monolingual children as well as comparisons of bilingual children of varying levels of

development indicate that bilingualism can lead to superior performance on a

variety of intellectual skills (Diaz, 1985).
 
 

According to the “cultural difference theory” developed by Villegas (1991), the

vehicle for interaction in schools is language and if language is used by a subculture

or L.E.P. students in ways different from the mainstream, those students are at

disadvantage. This theory has come to explain the difference in achievement

between minority and majority students. It warns that children do not improve

academically when their language is suppressed and in fact they may suffer negative

emotional and cognitive consequences.
 
 

Rumbaut (1995) examined the school progress of over 15,000 high school

students in San Diego, California who were children of foreign-born parents. These

students -that were already bilingual- had better grades and lower dropout rates

than those classified as English-only students, even though the parents of the

English-only students were of higher socio-economic status. This not only ratifies the

superiority of bilingual education, but also shows the fallacy of those theories that

consider immigrants and language minority students “inferior and beyond help”.
 
 

The National Center for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language

Learning (1992) recommends that all teachers need to know something about how

children learn a second language and that intuitive assumptions are often mistaken

and children can be harmed. One of the studies of this institution found some

interesting points with regard to commonly held myths and misconceptions about

the learning of a second language.
 
 

Research results have demonstrated that adolescents and adults perform better

than young children learning L2.

Research indicates that increasing the exposure (time / content) of L.E.P.

students to English does not speed up the acquisition of the language.

Face-to-face communication does not imply proficiency in the more complex

academic language needed to engage in classroom activities.
 
 

One of the most salient features of a bilingual education program is the use of the

first language as the medium of instruction. It supplies background knowledge to

make English input more comprehensible, enhances the development of basic

literacy and helps in advanced literacy (Krashen, 1991). Research evidence suggests

that advanced first languages has cognitive advantages, practical advantages, and

promotes a healthy sense of biculturalism (Hakuta, 1986).
 
 

Reading in the primary language will provide much of the “common underlying”

proficiency that helps ensure English language development (Cummins, 1991).

Research has proved that skills do transfer across languages. For this reason, it is

possible to think about transfer as occurring on a specific, skill-by-skill

componential basis, or more globally, where the entire structure of skills in a domain

transfers as a whole. In one experimental study, Hakuta (1990) found that transfer

occurred holistically and depended on general proficiency level in the first language.

Once you can read, you can read. This ability transfers to other languages that may

be acquired (Krashen, 1991).
 
 

Willig (1985) found in his meta-analysis research that bilingual education has

several positive effects, despite the fact that 65% of the studies were short-term,

lasting one year or less. His research results showed that the better the experimental

design of the study, the more positive were the findings with regard to the effects of

bilingual education. However, some critics claim that many L.E.P. students have

succeeded without bilingual education, under submersion programs. But the reality

is that they got plenty of “comprehensible input” in the second language and had de

facto some kind of bilingual support (Krashen, 1997).
 
 

Many people in the U.S. relate bilingual education to immigration. It is

important to note that more than half of minority-language speakers and more than

a third of those who report some difficult in English were born in the U.S. (Fix &

Passel, 1994).
 
 

II-Criticism

Bilingual education has many critics. Recently these programs were eliminated in

California. The division of bilingual education of M-DCPS state on this event that

“It is revolting that bilingual education has been killed at the hands of people who

do not understand its virtues. It is offensive that bilingual education continues to be

solely associated with immigration. It is shameful that we have forgotten that when

our forefathers founded this nation, English was not their exclusive language”

(www.dade.k12.fl.us/BFLS/htm).
 
 

Rossell & Baker (1996) and Porter (1996) are among the best-known critics of

bilingual education. They proposed the theory of “time on task” of English

acquisition, according to which the more time L.E.P. students are exposed to the

language, the faster and better they will learn it. They consider the results of several

studies that have proved that this theory is wrong so flawed that their findings are

useless. The arguments most often heard against bilingual education are: it does not

work; research on bilingual programs is inconsistent and contradictory; students in

bilingual programs do not acquire proficiency in English; and immersion is a better

choice (Krashen, 1991). Others do not claim that it does not work, but instead they

say that there is little evidence that it is superior to all-English programs.
 
 

Opponents of bilingual education tell us that the public is against its programs.

But the real problem is that the questions asked in those surveys were biased facing

bilingual education and learning English as mutually exclusive, as a dichotomy

(Krashen, 1997). Most of the people, however, are opposed to certain wrong

practices in some called bilingual programs.
 
 

Bilingual education continues to receive criticism in the national media which

often is based on misconceptions about its goals and practices (Krashen, 1997).

McQuillan & Tse found that press coverage of bilingual education has been

disproportionately hostile compared with the findings of educational research. A

recent survey of publications between 1984 and 1994 found that 82% of empirical

studies and literature reviews were favorable to bilingual education as compared

with only 45% of editorials in major newspapers.
 
 

Other researchers (Ovando & Collier, 1985) who support bilingual education

censure the isolation and lack of connections between bilingual and non-bilingual

programs within most bilingual schools which fosters alienation between bilingual

and non-bilingual teachers. They stated that there are reports of bilingual teachers

feeling like second class citizens within their schools and that many mainstream

teachers mistrust and misunderstand the motives and methods of bilingual teachers.

Some bilingual teachers also complain of lack of appropriate books and other

materials designed to meet the needs of their students.
 
 

III-Politics

Although being a nation of immigrants, the policies of American governments

have caused that most of the languages brought by immigrants have disappeared as

part of the process of assimilation which last between two or three generations

(Veltman,1988) . Americans’ gross inadequacy in foreign-language skills is nothing

short of scandalous, and it is getting worse. The U.S. is widely recognized as

monolingual when judged in terms of its interests and success in the study of foreign

languages (Simon, 1980).
 
 

Wong Filmore (1991) has found that L.E.P. students feel social pressures to

relinquish their home language which can retard their cognitive and linguistic

development. Home language loss can also have serious negative consequences for

parent-child relationships when parents are English limited themselves which is the

case in most situations. The younger the children, the more susceptible they are to

social forces that lead them to abandon their first language.
 
 

The U.S. Congress defined as part of its policy in the Title VII, Part A, of the

Improving America’s School Act of 1994, that proficient bilingualism is a desirable

goal, which can bring cognitive, academic, cultural, and economic benefits to

individuals and to the nation. In addition to that, the Congress stated that L.E.P.

students should not be viewed anymore as a special case, defined primarily by a

language “deficit” and in need for compensatory programs. Now, they are seen as

children who share the same capabilities, face many of the same obstacles, and

deserve all of the same opportunities as other American children. Congress also

recognized the substantial benefits of programs the are fully bilingual, especially

those that aim to preserve and cultivate children’s native-language skills. Legal and

ethical constrains ruled out the use of programs with “sink or swim” instruction

(Crawford, 1977).
 
 

Today’s immigrants appear to be acquiring English more rapidly than ever

before. About 3 in 4 Hispanic immigrants, after 15 years in this country, speak

English on a regular daily basis, while 70% of their children become dominant or

monolingual in English, often losing their Spanish skills (Veltman, 1988). If the

languages represented by American linguistic minorities were seen as a natural

resource, such as species of birds or trees, there would be public clamor to set up

investigative commissions to monitor and prevent their rapid extinction (Hakuta,

1990).
 
 

IV-Hispanics

Latino students over the last century have been described as “mentally

retarded,” “linguistically handicapped,” “culturally and linguistically deprived,”

“semi-lingual,” and more euphemistically, “at risk” (Flores, 1982). With an overall

population in the U.S. rapidly approaching 25 million, and a majority of the student

population in some largest school districts, Latinos are arguably worse off today

than in previous decades (Portes, 1986).
 
 

School failure persists among a disproportionate number of language minority

students. For Hispanics, dropout rates remain higher than for other groups. Those

who stay in school often graduate without the rigorous preparation needed to

compete in the job market. Large numbers of L.E.P. children continue to receive

instruction that is substandard to what English speakers receive (August, Hakuta, &

Pompa, 1994). Hispanic dropout rates remain unacceptably high. 30% of Hispanic

youth age 16-24, had failed to complete high school in October of 1994, compared

with 13% of African - Americans, and 8% of non-Hispanic Whites. Research has

identified multiple factors associated with this problem: recent arrival in the U.S.,

family poverty, limited English proficiency, low academic achievement, and being

retained in grade (Crawford, 1997).
 
 

One Southern California study found that most school libraries serving large

Hispanic enrollments had only 2.2 to 5.5 books per child and an average of 0.1 to 1

in Spanish (Pucci, 1994). To make this situation even worse, Ramirez (1991) found

that L.E.P. Spanish-speaking students have little access to books at home: about 22

books per home for the entire family as an average; poor families have even less.
 
 

Hispanic students are well behind majority children in socioeconomic status.

Approximately 40% of Hispanic children live in poverty, compared to 15% of

non-Hispanic White children, and 45% live with parents who have completed high

school, compared to 81% of non-Hispanic White children. Only 68% live with both

parents, compared to 81% of non-Hispanic White children. Hispanic, Black, and

Native American students have twice the odds of dropping out compared to White

students (Rumberger, 1983).
 
 

Many educators think that the reasons for the historical underachievement of

Latino students could be found in their “special needs.” They believe that changes

are required only in the children and their families’ circumstances, instead of in the

schools and teaching methods (Trueba & Bartolome, 1997).
 
 

V-Programs

To meet the L.E.P. students’ needs there are two different approaches: bilingual

education and immersion. We can identify three different bilingual programs: TBE

(transitional or early-exit), DBE (maintenance or late-exit), and two-way bilingual

or bilingual immersion. As part of the immersion approach there are three different

models: SAIP (structured immersion or sheltered English), submersion or “sink or

swim” (illegal, violates civil rights), and pullout (submersion + ESL classes)

(Crawford, 1997).
 
 

Today, 17 years after the inception of the Bilingual Education Act, very little

empirical information exists that describes the types of special services and

institutional strategies that best meet the linguistic and academic needs for L.E.P.

students. We still do not have an acceptable theoretical framework to guide the

effective instruction of L.E.P. students (Tikinoff, 1985).
 
 

There is little value conducting evaluations to determine which type of program

is best. The key issue is not finding a program that works for all children and all

localities, but rather finding a set of program components that works for the

children in the community of interest, given that community’s goals, demographics,

and resources (August & Hakuta, 1997).
 
 

When transitional bilingual education and immersion programs were compared

in 28 studies with regard to English language achievement, the results showed that

TBE is just as good, if not better, than immersion programs 79% of the time

(Rossell & Ross, 1986), as the following table shows:
 
 

Results of Studies

TBE is better......................8

No difference....................14

Immersion is better..........6
 
 

Recent research shows that when bilingual programs are set up correctly, they

work very well. In well-designed bilingual programs students consistently

outperformed comparison students and did very well compared to local and national

norms. We defined a “well-designed” program as one that had comprehensible

input in English, in the form of high quality ESL classes, subject matter taught in

the first language until proficiency in English is achieved, and literacy development

in the first language, which transfer to the second language (Krashen & Biber,

1988).
 
 

The ideal bilingual program, according to Krashen (1991) should be structured

as follows:
 
 

Level Mainstream Sheltered English / First Language

of English instruction ESL instruction instruction

1-Beginning Art, Music, ESL All core subjects

(I & II) and P.E.

2-Intermediate “ “ ESL, Math, Science Language Arts and

(III) Social Studies

3-Advanced Art, Music, ESL & Social Studies Language Arts

(IV) P.E., Math and Science.

4-Mainsream All core subjects ------------------ Enrichment
 
 

If your instructional objective is to help kids stay where they are, then give them

immersion or early-exit programs and they will keep their place in society. If your

concern is to help kids catch up with the mainstream  population, use more primary

language. In the late-exit programs they are growing faster in content areas and in

English too. It is really clear that you will not slow down a child’s acquisition of

English by providing large amounts of native language instruction (Ramirez, 1991).

Research over the past two decades has determined that, despite appearances, it

takes children a long time to attain proficiency in a second language. Often L.E.P.

students are quick to learn conversational English, but they normally need 4 to 7

years to acquire academic English, if provided quality bilingual education, or seven

to ten years, if provided only ESL instruction (Collier & Thomas, 1989).
 
 

Collier (1989) summarized her work as well as that of other researchers

indicating that L.E.P. students from a variety of language backgrounds will do catch

up with native-speakers of English after a minimum of 4 years, regardless of the

type of program, the language, and their social status. Cummins (1981) said that

non-English speakers require 2 years to attain basic interpersonal communication

skills (BICS), but need 5 to 7 years to develop cognitive academic language

proficiency (CALP). Research suggests that language acquisition is a natural

process that cannot be speeded up, although, not doubt, it can be slowed down

through inappropriate schooling (Collier & Thomas, 1989).
 
 

There is no basis for the concern that native-language instruction might impede

the acquisition of English. To the contrary, there is considerable evidence that skill

and knowledge learned in the first language “transfer” readily to the second.

Congress recognized the value of preserving, rather than replacing, a child’s native

language: first, as a foundation for learning, and second as a  source of valuable

skills (Crawford,1997). Christian & Mahrer (1992) rely on developmental bilingual

strategies for cultivating -rather than replacing- the native language skills of

minority language students.
 
 

The native language and the second language are complementary rather than

mutually exclusive. Further, native language proficiency is a powerful predictor of

the rapidity of second language development. Greater elaboration of the native

language results in more efficient acquisition of the second language (Hakuta, 1990).

School programs that strive for additive bilingualism -supporting L.E.P. children’s

native language while they learn English- have proven superior to subtractive

approaches not only in cognitive - academic benefits, but in socio-cultural

advantages as well (Ramirez, 1991; Lambert, 1984). The greater the amount of first

language instructional support, combined with balanced second-language support,

the higher the second language academic achievement in each succeeding academic

year (Collier, 1992). The method of concurrent translation or teaching partly in

Spanish and partly in English, has shown to be ineffective (Legarreta, 1979).
 
 

Programs for L.E.P. students must be designed and administered quite

differently than they currently are. Resources are dispersed, children’s needs are

only partially addressed, educational services are fragmented, and different projects

are rarely coordinated; the education of L.E.P. students is not conceived as part of

any larger mission; programs to address their unique needs tend to remain

ghettoized and these students are not expected to meet the same high standards as

mainstream children. We must reorient American schools away from the old

assumptions that minority children can learn only basic skills and that bilingualism

is a handicap to be overcome (August, Hakuta, & Pompa, 1994). Bilingual programs

will not realize their true potential unless they do a much better job of providing a

print-rich environment in the primary language. Research indicates that reading,

especially free voluntary reading, is a major source of both language and literacy

development, as well as knowledge (Krashen, 1991).
 
 

VI-Statistics

Language diversity is the demographic reality that inspired the Bilingual

Education Act of 1968. The 1990 census counted 6.3 million youth aged 5-17 who

speak languages other than English at home. By a more expansive definition of

“language minority”, there were 9.9 million children, 22% of the school-age

population. Almost 32 million residents (nearly one in seven) spoke home languages

other than English (see Table I). Today, these figures are still higher. It is difficult to

estimate the real number of L.E.P. students in the public school systems in our

nation because of the discrepancies between the census and SEA estimates (see

Table II). Spanish is by far the most prevalent minority language in the U.S., spoken

by about 3 out of 4 L.E.P. students (Anstrom, 1996).
 
 

According to OBEMLA (1998) there are 3.2 million L.E.P. students nationwide

and only 1.3 million of those are in state and / or local bilingual programs. Over

75% of all L.E.P. students attend high poverty schools. The number of L.E.P.

students has nearly doubled in less than a decade. 72.9% of all L.E.P. students speak

Spanish.
 
 
 
 

Although there is some controversy concerning the effectiveness of bilingual

education as a valid, reliable approach for the instruction of L.E.P. students, many

research results and literature suggest that this system of instruction, if it is well

designed and executed, is effective. Therefore, it is hypothesized that Hispanic

students in inner-city high schools participating in bilingual programs will exhibit

significantly higher achievement than those participating in immersion programs.
 
 

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 _____ (1980). The cross-lingual dimensions of language proficiency: Implications for bilingual education and the optimal age issue. TESOL Quarterly, 14: 175-187.

 _____ (1976). The influence of bilingualism on cognitive growth: A synthesis of research findings and explanatory hypothesis. Working Papers on Bilingualism.

 Curiel, H., Rosenthal, J., & Richek, H. (1986). Impacts of bilingual education on secondary school grades, attendance, retentions, and drop-outs. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 8 (4): 357-367.

 de la Pena, F. (1991). Democracy or Babel? The case for official English in the United States. Washington, D.C.: U.S. English.

 Diaz, R. M. (1985). Bilingual cognitive development: Addressing three gaps in current research. Child Development, 56: 1376-1388.

 Diaz Salcedo, S. (1996). Successful Latino students at the high school level: A case study of ten students. Unpublished manuscript, Harvard University, Graduate School of Education.

 Dicker, S. J. (1996). Languages in America: A pluralist view. Avon, England: Multilingual Matters Ltd.

 Fisher, C. W., Guthrie, F. L., and Mandinach, E. B. (1983). Verification of bilingual instructional features study. San Francisco: Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development.

 Flores, B. M. (1982). Language interference or influence: Toward a theory for Hispanic bilingualism. Doctoral Dissertation (unpublished), University ofArizona at Tucson.

 Fix, M. & Passel, J. S. (1994). Immigration and immigrants: Setting the record straight. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute.

 Garcia, E. E. (1991). Education of linguistically and culturally diverse students: Effective instructional practices. National Center for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language Learning. Educational Practice Report no. 1.

 Garcia, G. N. (1994). Bilingual education: A look to the year 2000. NCBE Focus, Occasional Papers in Bilingual Education, 9.

 Garcia, O. (1995). Policy and practice in bilingual education: A reader extending the foundations. Avon, England: Multilingual Matters Ltd.

 Garcia, O. & Otheguy, R. (1994). The value of speaking a language other than English in U.S. businesses. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 532 (March): 99-122.

 General Accounting Office (GAO), U.S. (1987). Bilingual Education: A new look at the research evidence, GAO / PEMD-87-12BR. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office.

 Genesee, F. (1987). Learning through two languages: Studies of immersion and bilingual education. New York: Newbury House.

 Gersten, R. (1985). Structured immersion for language minority students: Results of a longitudinal evaluation. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis no. 7: 187-97.

 Ginsburg, A. (1992). Improving bilingual education programs through evaluation. Proceedings of the second national research symposium on limited English proficient student issues: Focus on evaluation and measurement. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs, 31-42.

 Gold, N. C. (1995). Bilingual and English language development teachers: Demand, supply, and shortage. Sacramento: California Department of Education, Complaints Management and Bilingual Compliance Unit.

 Gonzalez, G. & Maez, L. F. (1995). Advances in research in bilingual education. Directions in Language & Education. NCBE, Vol. 1, no. 5, (Fall).

 Gonzalez, J. M. (1979). Quality in bilingual education. Bilingual education in the integrated school. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 338103).

 Griego-Jones, T. (1995). Implementing bilingual programs is every body’s business. NCBE Focus, Occasional Papers in Bilingual Education, no.11 (Spring).

Hakuta, K. (1993). Federal education programs for limited-English-proficient students: A blueprint for the second generation. Stanford, CA.: Stanford Working Group.

 _____ (1990). Bilingualism and bilingual education: A research perspective. NCBE Focus, Occasional Papers in Bilingual Education, no. 1 (Spring).

 _____ (1987). Degree of bilingualism and cognitive ability in mainland Puerto Rican children. Child Development, 58: 1372-1388.

 _____ (1986). Mirror of language: The debate on bilinguism. New York: Basic Books.

 Hakuta, K. & Cancino, H. (1977). Trends in second language acquisition research. Harvard Educational Review, 47: 294-316.

 Hakuta, K. & D’Andrea, D. (1992). Some properties of bilingual maintenance and loss in Mexican background high-school students. Applied Linguistics 13, no. 1: 72-99.

 Hamers, J. & Blanc, M. (1989). Bilinguality and bilingualism. Cambridge: Cambridge University.

 Harklau, L. (1994). E.S.L. versus mainstream classes: Contrasting L2 learning environments. TESOL Quarterly, 28 (2).

 Hewlett-Gomez, M. & Rawson, A. (1980). Instructional models for Spanish / English bilingual classrooms. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 299803).

 Hispanic Dropout Project. (1996) Data Book. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education.

 Hopstock, P. & Bucaro, B. (1995). A review and analysis of estimates of L.E.P. student population. Arlington, Va.: Development Associates.

 Hwang, L. (1996, Sept.-Oct.). Two languages are better than one. Third Force, vol. 4 no. 4: 22-27.

 Kloss, H. (1977). The American bilingual tradition. Rowley, Mass.: Newbury House.

 Krashen, S. (1998, July). Bilingual education and the dropout argument. Discover , no. 4.

 _____ (1997, Jan.) Why bilingual education? (ERIC Digest, Document Reproduction Service No. ED 403101).

_____ (1996). Under attack: The case against bilingual education. Culver City, CA.: Language Education Associates.

 _____ (1991). Bilingual education: A focus on current research. NCBE Focus, Occasional Papers in Bilingual Education, no. 3 (Spring).

 Krashen, S. & Biber, D. (1988). On course: Bilingual education’s success in California. Sacramento, CA.: California Association for Bilingual Education.

 Lambert, W. E. (1985). Some cognitive and socio-cultural consequences of being bilingual. In Alatis, J. E. & Staczek (eds.). Perspectives on bilingualism and bilingual education. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press.

 _____ (1984). An overview of issues in immersion education. Studies on immersion education: A collection for United States Educators. Sacramento: California State Department of Education, Office of Bilingual Bicultural Education.

 Lau v. Nichols. (1974). 414 U.S. 563.

 Legarreta, D. (1979). The effects on program models on language acquisition by Spanish-speaking children. TESOL Quarterly, 8: 521-534.

 Leighton, M. S., Hightower, A. M., & Wrigley, P. (1995). Model strategies in bilingual education: Professional development. Washington, D.C.: Policy Studies Associates.

 Lindholm, K. J. & Aclan, Z. (1991). Bilingual proficiency as a bridge to academic achievement: Results from bilingual / immersion programs. Journal of Education 173, no. 2: 99-113.

 Lucas, T. & Katz, A. (1994). Reframing the debate: The roles of native languages in English-only programs for language minority students. TESOL Quarterly, 28 (3): 537-561.

 McCollum, H & Russo, A. (1993). Model strategies in bilingual education: Family literacy and parent involvement. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Education.

 McCown, R. R. & Roop, P. (1992). Educational psychology and classroom practice: A partnership. Needham Heights, Mass.: Allyn & Bacon.

 McDonnell, L. M. & Hill, P. T. (1993). Newcomers in American schools: Meeting the educational needs of immigrant youth. Santa Monica, CA.: Rand Corp.

 McQuillan, J. & Tse, L. (In press). Does research matter? An analysis of media opinion on bilingual education, 1984-1994. Bilingual Research Journal.

 Mertens, J., Bateman, P., and Tallmadge, K. (1990). Descriptive evaluations of the transition program for refugee children and the emergency immigrant education program: Data collection, sampling, and analysis plan. Washington, D.C.: Cosmos Corporation.

 Meyer, M. M. & Fienberg, S. E. (1992). Assessing evaluation studies: The case of bilingual education strategies. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

 Minicucci, C. & Olsen, L. (1992). Meeting the challenge of diversity: An evaluation of programs for pupils with limited proficiency in English. Vol. V, An exploratory study of Secondary L.E.P. Programs. Berkeley, CA.: BW Associates.

 Moll, L. C. (1992). Bilingual classroom studies and community analysis: Some recent trends. Educational Research, 21 (2): 20-24.

 National Center for Research on Cultural Diversity and Second Language Learning. (1992, Dec.). Myths and misconceptions about second language learning. Santa Cruz, CA.: University of California.

 New York City Board of Education. (1994). Educational Progress of students in bilingual and E.S.L. programs: A longitudinal study., 1990-1994. New York: NCBE.

 Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs (OBEMLA), U.S. (1998, May). Facts about limited English proficient students. Washington, D.C.: NCBE.

 _____ (1992). The condition of bilingual education in the nation: A report to Congress and the President. Washington, D.C.: NCBE.

 Ogbu, J. (1992). Understanding cultural diversity. Educational Researcher, 21 (8): 5-24.

 _____ (1991). Immigrant and involuntary minorities in comparative perspective. In Gibson & Ogbu (eds.), Minority status and schooling: A comparative study of immigrant and involuntary minorities, pp.3-33. New York: Garland.

 _____ (1983, June). Minority status and schooling in plural societies. Comparative Education Review, 27 (2): 168-190.

 _____ (1978). Minority education and caste: The American system in cross-cultural perspective. New York: Academic Press.

Ovando, C. & Collier, V. (1985) Bilingual and E.S.L. classrooms: Teaching in multicultural contexts. New York: McGraw-Hill.

 Pena, A. (1986). Implementation procedures in bilingual education: The differences between success and failure. Paper presented at the Conference of the National Association of Bilingual Education, Chicago, Il.

 Porter, R. (1996). The politics of bilingual education revisited. The failure of bilingual education. Washington, D.C.: Center for Equal Opportunity.

 _____ (1990). Forked tongue: The politics of bilingual education. New York: Basic Books, Inc.

 Portes, A. (1996). The new second generation. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

 Pucci, S. L. (1994). Supporting Spanish language literacy: Latino children and free reading resources in schools. Bilingual Research Journal 18, nos. 1-2: 67-82.

 Ramirez, J. (1991). Final Report: Longitudinal study of structured immersion strategy, early-exit and late-exit transitional bilingual education programs for language -minority children. Executive Summary. San Mateo, CA.: Aguirre International.

 Reyhner, J. & Tennant, E. (1995). Maintaining and renewing native language. Bilingual Research Journal 19: 279-304.

 Rossell, C. & Baker, R. (1996). The educational effectiveness of bilingual education. Research in the Teaching of English 30: 7-74.

 Rossell, C. & Ross, J. M. (1986). The social science evidence on bilingual education. Journal of Law and Education.

 Rumbaut, R. (1995). The new Californians: Comparative research findings on the educational progress of immigrant children. In R. Rumbaut & W. Cornelius (ed.). California’s immigrant children. University of California, San Diego: Center for U.S. - Mexican Studies, 17-69.

 Rumberger, R. (1983). Dropping out of high school: The influence of race, sex, and family background. American Educational Research Journal 20 (2): 199-220.

 Sakash, K. & Rodriguez-Brown, F. V. (1995). Teamwork: Mainstream and bilingual / E.S.L. teacher collaboration. Washington, D.C.: NCBE.

 Schlesingger, Jr., Arthur M. (1992). The disuniting of America: Reflections on a multicultural society. New York: W.W. Norton.

Shockey, K. (1991). Bilingual education: A resource guide for educators and administrators. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 348863).

 Silcox, Barbara. (1997). OBMELA releases SEA Report for 1994-95. Cross Currents, Vol. 1, no. 2 (Winter).

 Simon, P. (1980). The tongue-tied American. New York: Continuum Press.

 Skutnabb-Kangas, T. (1991). Language, literacy, and minorities. London: The Minority Rights Group.

 _____ (1981). Bilingualism or not: The education of minorities. Multilingual Matters, 7. Clevedon, England: Multilingual Matters, Ltd.

 Sontag, D (1993, June 29). A fervent “no” to assimilation in new America. The New York Times, A10.

 Tallmadge, G., Lam, T., and Gamel, N. (1987). Evaluation of bilingual education programs for language-minority, limited English proficiency students: A status report with recommendations for future development (Phase I Report). Mountain View, CA.: RMC Research Corporation.

 Tikunoff, W. J. (1985). Applying significant bilingual instructional features in the classroom. Study designed to improve the instruction provided to minority language limited-English-proficient students. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

 _____ (1984). Equitable schooling opportunity in a multicultural milieu. Commissioned paper. Portland, OR: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory.

 _____ (1983). Five significant bilingual instructional features. In Compatibility of the SBIF features with other research on instructional for limited English proficient students, pp. 5-17. San Francisco, CA.: Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development.

 Tinajero, J. V. & Ada, A. F. (1993). The power of two languages: Literacy and bi-literacy for Spanish-speaking students. New York: Macmillan / McGraw-Hill.

 Trueba, H. T. (1989). Raising silent voices: Educating linguistic minorities for the 21st. century. New York: Harper & Row.

 _____ (1987). Success or failure: Learning and the language minority student. New York: Newbury.

 Trueba, H. T. & Bartolome, L. I. (1997). The education of Latino students: Is school reform enough? (ERIC / CUE Digest, Document Reproduction Service No. ED 410367).

 Veltman, C. (1988). The future of the Spanish language in the United States. Washington, DC: Hispanic Policy Development Project.

 Villegas, A. M. (1991). Culturally responsive teaching. Princeton, NJ.: Educational Testing Service.

Willig, A. (1985). A meta-analysis of selected studies on the effectiveness of bilingual education. Review of Educational Research 55: 269-317.

 Wong Fillmore, L. (1991). When learning a second language means losing the first. Early Childhood Research Quarterly 6: 323-46.

 _____ (1983). Effective language use in bilingual classroom. In Compatibility of the SBIF features with other research on instruction for limited English proficient students, pp. 43-61. San Francisco, CA.: Far West Laboratory for Educational Research and Development.

 About some of the authors whose work was reviewed.

 -Diane August is an independent consultant based n Bethesda, Maryland. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University.

 -James Crawford is an independent writer and lecturer, former editor of Education Week. He has published several books on bilingual education.

 -Kenji Hakuta received his training under Roger Brown and Jill de Villers at Harvard University, where he received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology. He is a professor at the Stanford University College of Education.

 -Stephen Krashen is a professor of linguistics at the University of Southern California

 -Delia Pompa is the director of the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs in the U.S. Department of Education.
 

For more information about this topic, visit my page: Bilingual Education & Hispanic Links.
Please, let me know your opinion about the issues presented here.
Thanks,
 
 

Carlos J. Díaz


18-Syllabus of Courses / Programas de los Cursos

 

Hialeah Senior High

Course Title: World History / World History Honors
Course Code: 2109310
/2109320

Instructor: Mr. Carlos J. Diaz (335)

305-822 1500 Ext 2445

diazc@dadeschools.net

cardi55@comcast.net

Course Description: A chronological and thematic study of the World History from the Byzantine Empire to the post-cold war era.

Method of Instruction: Lectures using class website; questions, debate, and knowledge contests; considerable use of audiovisuals
(educational video programs
, multimedia presentations, documentaries, and classic historical films). Independent study or homework, including reading, analyzing movies, writing essays, and doing research are major components of the instructional process, as well as the use of cooperative learning strategies.

Course Objectives:

1-To study major events and personalities in World History from the fall of the Roman Empire to the present time.

2-To promote bilingualism and cooperative learning (stress the development of English for ESOL students); to promote the
de
velopment of the individual skills and talents of each student; to teach the students: to compare and contrast historical events, to
id
entify facts from opinions, to use and understand, primary sources, graphs, statistics tables, maps and political cartoons, to analyze causes and effects, to work with biographies, timelines, chronologies, almanacs and encyclopedias.

3-To reinforce note-taking, reading skills and independent study. To prepare the students to use technology as a critical tool for
hi
storical research, preparing projects and other academic activities. To recognize the steps of inquiry as stating the problem, gathering data, developing a hypothesis, analyzing and evaluating the information, and reaching a conclusion

4- To recognize the major works of art and literature created throughout history and understand how they have impacted past and present civilizations; to integrate geography and history, and to use the best examples of world cinema as a support for a better understanding of historical events.

5-To promote tolerance and interaction to/with other human beings and different cultures; to create a better understanding of the
moral
, ethical, and legal obligations that all human beings have toward each other. To teach the meaning of democracy and to develop social and political participation skills; to acquire critical thinking and decision-making skills.            .               ,

Course Chapters and Dates:

1st NINE WEEKS: Medieval History

1st. WEEK: GENERAL INFORMATION

2nd. WEEK (4 days): Byzantine Empire, Germanic People, Crusades, Seljuk Turks, Ottoman Empire)

 3rd.  & 4th. WEEKS (5 days): Rise of Islam

5th.WEEK (3 days): Medieval Asia: China (Sui, Tang, Song, Yuan), Mongols, Southeast Asia, Korea, Japan   

6th. WEEK (3 days): Middle Ages in Europe (Kiev Russ, Feudalism, Catholic Church, Monastic Orders, Crusades, Hastings, House Capet, Universities, Hundred Years War, Black Death, Great Schism)

7th, WEEK (4 days): African Civilizations (Mali, Ghana, Songhai, Ibn Battuta, Indian Ocean Trade, Zimbabwe, Swahili, Slave Trade)

8th. WEEK (4 days): Ancient America (Mayas, Aztecs, Incas)

9th. Week: Review

 2nd NINE WEEKS: Modem History


 
10th & 11th WEEK (6 Days): Rise of Europe (Renaissance, Scientific Revolution, Reformation)

12th. & 13th WEEK (6 days): Age of Exploration

 

14th. WEEK (3 Days): Asia in Transition (China: Ming & Qing, Taiping Rebellion, Japan: Tokugawa & Shogunate, Europeans in Asia)

 

15th. WEEK (3 Days): Muslim Empires (Ottoman, Safavid, Mughal)

16th. & 17th. WEEKS (5 Days): Absolutism & Enlightenment

 18th. Week: Review 

 

--------- C H R I S T M A S   R E C E S S --------
 

3rd NINE WEEKS: Modem History II
 

19th. WEEK (4 Days): Empires & Colonies in the Americas 

20th.. WEEK (3 Days): Industrial Revolution 

21st. WEEK (3 Days): Age of Revolutions (America & France) 

22nd. WEEK (4 Days): Latin American Revolution

23rd• & 24th.. WEEKS 6 Days): Age of "Isms" (Capitalism, Socialism, Communism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Expressionism, Realism

25th WEEK (4 Days): Imperialism

26th. WEEK: Review  

 

-----------S P R I N G B REA K--------------

 

4th NINE WEEKS: CONTEMPORARY HISTORY

27th. WEEK (3 Days): Nationalism & Militarism

28th. WEEK (3 Days): WW 1(1914-19)

29th. WEEK (4 Days): Interwar Period (1919-39)

30th. WEEK (3 Days): WW II (1939-45)

31st.. WEEK (3 Days): Cold War (West) 1945-91

32ndWEEK (3 Days) Cold War (East) 1945-91

33rdWEEK (3 Days): New World Era 1991-2000

34th. WEEK (3 Days): 21st Century 2000-Present

35th. WEEK: REVIEW

Texts and Materials

l-Glencoe's World History I World History and Geography - Florida Edition - 2013 (Online Book)

2-Several short reading

3~Films (http://home.comcast.neti-diaz1955/videos.htm)

4-Classic works of World Literature

(http://home.comcast.netl-cardi55/myclassroom.htm#Book1)

5-Multimedia presentations and documentaries
http://home.comcast.neti-DiazWHPresent/index.htm (PowerPoint Presentations)

6-Students and parents should use the class' website designed to help them with all the activities and assignments of the course:
http://DiazSocialStudies.org

Grading Policy

All academic evaluations will be based on the letter grade system (A, B, C, D, F); I usually grade on a curve, according the results of
the class in each evaluation. In Conduct: students that had to be warned from time to time for behavioral problems may receive B/C;
students that were sent to CSI at least once for disruptive behavior may receive DIP. In Effort: students with A, B, C will receive 1;
s
tudents with D will receive 2; and students with F will receive 3. For class participation you will receive 5 of your grade. The best
students will receive certificates every month and trophies at the end of the school year;

 

1-Quizzes (one per chapter), Thinking Maps, Knowledge Contests (in teams)

20

2-Classwork (one per chapter / in teams)

20

3-Reseach Projects (one per month I homework in teams)

20

4-Reading Quizzes, Reading Plus (homework / progress), Reading Contests (in teams)

15

5-Film Analysis (homework / 5 per nine weeks)

15

6-Primary Sources and Essays

5

7 -Class Participation

5

Notes: Bring Index Cards & a Dictionary to Quizzes. Do Make-up Work (Chapter Summary / two pages per "F") to replace

 

any "F" with a "C". Any work received late will receive a lower grade.

 

Other Course Components

All students are expected to take notes during lectures, ask questions when necessary and participate in debates and discussions.
Compliance with home
work deadlines will affect the grades. Projects and Film Analysis have very clear guidelines to follow; you will
receive them at
the beginning of the school year or you can access them in the class website (section My Classroom). Plagiarism
and
/or cheating of any kind will not be tolerated. The deadline for video analysis is always the Friday before the last week of the
period of nine weeks
. Dates for quizzes and projects will be announced in class.

Homework

1-Use / read Lecture Notes-in class website and textbook chapters to prepare for quizzes.
2
-Prepare Index Cards

3-Do make-up work to replace any "F".

4-Watch educational videos included in Lecture Notes in class website.
5-Do Film Analysis from the class list using provided form.
6-Resea
rch Projects in teams.

7-Do and bring any pending work caused by absences.
8-Prepare for Knowledge Contests using study guides provided.
9-Do specific activities (Thinking Maps, Essays, extra chapters from workbook, etc.) assigned for homework.

 

Classroom Rules & Discipline

1-RESPECT and GOOD MANNERS ARE REQUIRED

2-BRING an ENGLISH-SPANISH and/ or a HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH DICTIONARY to CLASS AS NEEDED
3-ASK FOR PERMISSION to INTERRUPT BY RAISING YOUR HAND, and WAIT FOR IT!

4-ALWAYS BRING AT LEAST THREE #2 PENCILS / LEAD PENCILS & SHARPENER

5-BRING A NOTEBOOK or BINDER to TAKE NOTES in CLASS (Mandatory!)

6- THE USE OF CELL PHONES, IPODs, MP3 PLAYERS, VIDEO GAMES, IS NOT ALLOWED IN CLASS
7-BRING the WORKBOOK the DAY YOU HAVE to USE IT

8-DON'T TALK WITH OTHER STUDENTS DURING LECTURES, VIDEOS, etc. UNLESS YOU ECEIVE
PERMISSION.

9-SLEEPING IN CLASS IS NOT PERMITTED. IF YOU DONT FEEL WELL, YOU MAY GO TO THE CLINIC.
10-NEVER LEAVE THE CLASS WITHOUT PERMISSION and a PASS.

11-IN CASE YOU FINISH THE ACTIVITIES FOR THE DAY EARLY, YOU SHOULD READ (magazines & newspapers
are available in class) IN SILENCE or DO SOME WORK.

12-WAIT FOR THE BELL IN YOUR SEAT. STAY A WAY FORM THE DOOR!

13-WHEN THERE IS ANYTHING YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND, ASK! YOUR TEACHER IS AVAILABLE TO PROVIDE EXTRA HELP BEFORE & AFTER SCHOOL HOURS: ASK!

If you don't come prepared and willing to work/ learn and to respect others in school, you don't belong in c1ass

THOSE WHO VIOLATE THE RULES WILL BE SUBJECTED TO THE FOLLOWING DISCIPLINARY MEASURES

 

1-WARNING (2 times)

2- TEMPORARILY EXCLUDED FROM THE CLASS (CSI)
3-PARENT CONFERENCE MEETING (Anyone sent to CSI twice)
4-REFERRAL TO AN ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL (any serious offense or continuous violations)

Emergency Procedures

In case of Fire Alarm, take your things with you and quickly and carefully follow the escape route; only in case that you are told that it
is a fire drill you will leave your stuff in the classroom. In case of a Red Code we will lock the room doors and turn off the lights;
students must stay away from doo
rs and windows and stay very quiet.

Extra Information

For more information on course content, visit:

World History Regular: http://www.floridastandards.org/Courses/PublicPreviewCourse662.aspx

For information on Progress Reports, Report Cards, the school calendar, school activities, etc. visit:  http://hhs.dadeschools.net/ and http://www.hialeahhigh.org/

General information for Patents: http://www.fldoe.orglfamilies/

 


Hialeah Senior High
AP World History
Instructor: Mr. Carlos J. Diaz
305-822 1500 Ext. 2478
cardi55@comcast.net

Course Description

This is a college level full-year course with an emphasis in non-Western history. Students will learn about the interactions among world civilizations over time, accentuating trends, patterns, causes and consequences, comparisons, changes and continuities in the history of major societies. Critical components of this course are the Five Themes and the Habits of Mind outlined as part of this course description whose main goals are to increase students’ analytical abilities and historical factual knowledge. Reading and understanding primary sources as well as writing different types of historical essays are essential parts of this course.

AP World History Themes

1-Interaction among and within societies and between humans and the environment (demography, migrations, technology, wars).

2-Development and interaction of cultures (religions, philosophies, ideologies, science and technology, arts and architecture).

3-States, emergence, expansion and conflicts (political structures and forms of government, empires, nations and nationalism, revolutions, wars)

4-Creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems (agriculture, trade, labor, industrialization, capitalism and socialism)

5-Development and transformation of social structures (gender roles, family, racial and ethnic constructions, social and economic classes)

 Habits of Mind

. Constructing and evaluating arguments: using evidence to make plausible arguments.

. Using documents and other primary data: developing the skills necessary to analyze point of view, context, and bias, and to understand and interpret information.

. Developing the ability to assess issues of change and continuity over time.

. Enhancing the capacity to handle diversity of interpretations through analysis of context, bias, and frame of reference.

. Seeing global patterns over time and space while also acquiring the ability to connect local developments to global ones and to move through levels of generalizations from the global to the particular.

. Developing the ability to compare within and among societies, including comparing societies and reactions to global processes.

. Developing the ability to assess claims of universal standards yet remaining aware of human commonalities and differences; putting culturally diverse ideas and values in historical context, not suspending judgment but developing understanding. 

Texts and other resources 

  1. The Earth and Its Peoples, by Richard Bulliet et. al., Boston: Houghton Mifflin; 3er AP ed., 2004
  2. The Human Record, by Alfred Andrea and James Overfield, Boston: Houghton Mifflin; 5th ed., 2004
  3. AP World History Course Home Page: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/courses/teachers_corner/4484.html
  4. Class Website: http://DiazSocialStudies.org or http://home.comcast.net/~cardi55/
  5. Bridging World History, multimedia course: http://www.learner.org/resources/series197.html
  6. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies.: Documentary based on the book by Jared Diamond, produced by the National Geographic Society.

Part I –Ch. #1: Valley River Civilizations. Agriculture Revolution....55 min.
Part II-Ch. #15: Encounters with Europeans....55 min.
Part III- Ch. #18: Atlantic System & Africa.....55 min.

  1. Islam: Empire of Faith. PBS documentary.
  2. Reviews for the Test (any of the following):

 Chronological framework: 

Assignments and Grading Policy

Nine Weeks Grades...........................................................80%

Chapter Quizzes..........................................................................................30%

Reading and Analyzing Primary Sources................................................20%

Writing DBQ, CCOT and CC essays........................................................30%

Weekly Homework (Vocabulary, Chapter Charts, and Reading of textbook chapters in advance).............................20%

Midterm and Final Exam (Practice for the AP Test).........20%

A = 100 – 90 B =   89 – 80 C =   79 – 70 D = 69 – 60   F = less than 60 points

Course Requirements

Course Outline

 First Nine Weeks: Ancient History

1st.  week: General information, distribution of materials.

2nd. week: World Geography. The Essentials. Q1

3rd. week: Chapters #1 and #3: From the Origins to the River-Valley Civilizations (8000-1500 B.C.E.): Prehistory, Mesopotamia, Egypt, and The Indus Valley Civilization. The Mediterranean and the Middle East (2000 – 500 B.C.E.): Cosmopolitan Middle East, 1700-1100 B.C.E.; The Aegean World, 2000-1100 B.C.E.; The Assyrian Empire, 911-612 B.C.E.; Israel, 2000-500 B.C.E.; Phoenicia and the Mediterranean, 1200-500 B.C.E.; Failure and Transformation, 750-550 B.C.E. Q2

4th. week: Chapter #2: New Civilizations in the Eastern and Western Hemispheres (2200-250 B.C.E.): Early China, 2000-221 B.C.E.; Nubia, 3100 B.C.E. – 350 C.E.; The Olmec and Chavķn, 1200-250 B.C.E. Q3

5th. week: Chapter #4: Greece and Persia (Iran) (1000-30 B.C.E.): Ancient Iran, 1000-500 B.C.E.; The Rise of the Greeks, 1000-500 B.C.E.; The Struggle of Persia and Greece, 546-323 B.C.E.; The Hellenistic Synthesis, 323-30 B.C.E. Q4

6th. week: Chapter #5: An Age of Empires: Rome and Han China (753 B.C.E. – 600 C.E.): Rome’s Mediterranean Empire, 753 B.C.E. – 600 C.E.; The Origins of Imperial China, 221 B.C.E. – 220 C.E.; Imperial Parallels. Q5

7th. week: Chapter #6: India and Southeast Asia (1500 B.C.E. – 600 C.E.): Foundations of Indian Civilization, 1500 B.C.E.-300 C.E.; Imperial Expansion and Collapse, 324 B.C.E.-650 C.E.; Southeast Asia, 50-600 C.E. Q6

8th. week: Chapter #7: Networks of Communication and Exchange (300 B.C.E.-600 C.E.): The Silk Road, The Indian Ocean Maritime System, Routes Across the Sahara, Sub-Saharan Africa, and The Spread of Ideas. Q7

9th. week: Reserve

 Second Nine Weeks: Medieval History

10th. week: Chapter #8: The Rise of Islam (600-1200): Origins of Islam; The Rise and Fall of the Caliphate, 632-1258; Islamic Civilization. Q8

11th. week: Chapter #9: Christian Europe Emerges (600-1200): The Byzantine Empire, 600-1200; Early Medieval Europe, 600-1000; The Western Church; Kievan Russia, 900-1200; Western Europe Revives, 1000-1200; The Crusades, 1095-1204. Q9

12th. week: Chapters #10 & #12: Inner and East Asia (600-1200): The Early Tang Empires, 618-755; Rivals for Power in Inner Asia and China, 600-907; The Emergence of East Asia, to 1200; New Kingdoms in East Asia. Mongol Eurasia and Its Aftermath (1200-1500): The Rise of the Mongols, 1200-1260; The Mongols and Islam, 1260-1500; Regional Responses in Western Eurasia; Mongol Domination of China, 1271-1368; the Early Ming Empire, 1368-1500; Centralization and Militarism in East Asia, 1200-1500. Q10

13th. week: Chapter #11: Peoples and Civilizations of the Americas (600-1500): Classic Era Culture and Society in Mesoamerica, 600-900; The Post-classic Period in Mesoamerica, 900-1500; Northern People; Andean Civilizations, 600-1500. Q11

14th. week: Chapter #13: Tropical Africa and Asia (1200-1500): Tropical Lands and People, New Islamic Empires, Indian Ocean Trade, Social and Cultural Change. Q12

15th. week: Chapters #14 & #16: The Latin West (1200-1500): Rural Growth and Crisis; Urban Revival; Learning, Literature and the Renaissance; Political and Military Transformations. Transformations in Europe (1500-1750): Culture and Ideas; Social and Economic Life; Political Innovations. Q13

16th. week: Chapters #15 & #17: The Maritime Revolution, to 1550: Global Maritime Expansion Before 1450; European Expansion, 1400-1550; Encounters with Europe, 1450-1550. The Diversity of American Colonial Societies (1530-1770): The Columbian Exchange; Spanish America and Brazil; English and French Colonies in North America; Colonial Expansion and Conflict. Q14

17th. & 18th. week: Reserve

Christmas Break.................... Christmas Break.................... Christmas Break....................

Third Nine Weeks: Modern History

19th. week: Chapter #18: The Atlantic System and Africa (1550-1800): Plantations in the West Indies; Plantation Life in the Eighteenth Century; Creating the Atlantic Economy; Africa, the Atlantic, and Islam. Q15

20th. week: Chapter #19: Southwest Asia and the Indian Ocean (1500-1750): The Ottoman Empire, to 1750; The Safavid Empire, 1502-1722; The Mughal Empire, 1526-1761; Trade Empires in the Indian Ocean, 1600-1729. Q16

21st. week: Chapter #20: Northern Eurasia (1500-1800): Japanese Reunification; The Later Ming and early Qing Empires; The Russian Empire; Comparative Perspectives. Q17

................................February 8-12: FCAT Test: Writing ..........................

22nd. week: Chapters #21 & #23: Revolutionary Changes in the Atlantic World (1750-1850): Prelude to Revolution: The Eighteen-Century Crisis; The American Revolution, 1775-1800; The French Revolution, 1789-1815; Revolution Spreads, Conservatives Respond, 1789-1850. National Building & Economic Transformation in the Americas (1800-1890): Independence in Latin America, 1800-30; The Problem of Order, 1825-90; the Challenge of Social & Economic Change. Q18

23rd. week: Chapters #22 & #26: The Early Industrial Revolution (1760-1851): Causes of the Industrial Revolution; The Technological Revolution; The Impact of the Early Industrial Revolution; New Economic & Political Ideas; Industrialization and the Non-industrial World. The New Power Balance (1850-1900): New Technologies and the World Economy; Social Changes; Socialism & Labor Movements; Nationalism and the Unification of Germany and Italy; The Great Powers of Europe, 1871-1900; Japan Joins the Great Powers, 1865-1905. Q19

24th. week:  Chapters #24 & 27: Africa, India, and the New British Empire (1750-1870): Changes and Exchanges in Africa; India under British Rule; Britain’s Eastern Empire. The New Imperialism (1869-1914): Motives & Methods; The Scramble for Africa; Asia and Western Dominance; Imperialism in Latin America; The World Economy and the Global Environment. Q20

.....March 8-19: FCAT Test: Reading, Math, Science & NTR ....

27th. week: Chapter #25: Land Empires in the Age of Imperialism (1800-70): The Ottoman Empire; The Russian Empire; The Qing Empire. Q21

 ......................Spring Break.................. Spring Break..................... Spring Break..............

 Fourth Nine Weeks: Contemporary History

28th. week: Chapter #28: The Crisis of the Imperial Order (1900-1929): Origin of the Crisis; The “Great War” and the Russian Revolutions, 1914-18; Peace and Dislocation in Europe, 1919-29; China & Japan: Contrasting Destinies; The New Middle East; Society, Culture, and Technology in the Industrialize World. Q22

29st. week: Chapter #29: the Collapse of the Old Order (1929-49): The Stalin Revolution; The Depression; The Rise of Fascism; East Asia, 1931-45; The Second World War; The Character of Warfare. Q23

30th. week: Chapter 30: Striving for Independence: Africa, India and Latin America (1900-49): Sub-Saharan Africa, 1900-45; The Indian Independence Movement, 1905-47; The Mexican Revolution, 1910-40; Argentina & Brazil, 1900-1949. Q24

31st. week: Chapters #31 & 32: The Cold War and Decolonization (1945-1975): The Cold War; Decolonization & Nation Building; Beyond a Bipolar World. Crisis, Realignment and the Dawn of the Post-Cold War (1975-91): Postcolonial Crises and Asian Economic Expansion, 1975-1991; The End of a Bipolar World, 1989-91; The Challenge of Population Growth; Unequal Development & the Movement of Peoples; Technological & Environmental Change. Q25

32nd. week: Chapter #33: Globalization at the Turn of the Millennium: Global Political Economies; Trends & Visions; Global Culture. There is not Quiz for this last Chapter.

33rd. and 34th. weeks:...........................Reviews after School........ Reviews after School........ Reviews after School...............

35th. week: Final Review & AP Exam: May 13th.

36th. week: History goes to the Movies

37th. week: History goes to the Movies

Essays

1st. nine weeks: DBQ Essays (Located at the end of each chapter in the text book).

2nd. nine weeks: Compare & Contrast Essays (Cultures, periods, regions, religions, etc.)

3rd. nine weeks: Change and Continuity over Time Essays (Periods, regions, countries, etc).

4th. nine weeks: A different type of essay every week.

Notes: For DBQ essays students should analyze the content of each document –including p.o.v. / bias- in relation to the main question, identify and mention the source / location of each doc., and combine the documents according to their similarities. They should also suggest a doc., not included, that would be useful to provide important info to answer the main question.

For CC and CCOT essays students should address the following topics: Economy (agriculture, industry, and trade), society (situation of women), government (ruling group, political structure, military), science & technology, culture (religion, philosophy, art / literature, etc.), geography, etc.

Every essay must have an introduction and a conclusion.

Reading Primary Documents from “The Human Record”

After reading the intro and the passage(s), the students should answer the questions. This assignment is part of the homework.

Chapters 1 & 3: The Epic of Gilgamesh and the Judgments of Hammurabi. P. 5-17.

Chapter 2: The Book of Documents. P. 24-29.

Chapter 4: The Odyssey. P. 46-50

Chapter 5: The Writings of Master Han Fei. P. 96-98

Chapter 6: The Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, and Setting in Motion the Wheel of the Law. P. 63-73.

Chapter 7: Faxian, Travels. P. 163-166.

Chapter 8: The Quran. P. 232-239.

Chapter 9: The Jerusalem History. P. 368-372.

Chapters 10 & 12: Marco Polo, Description of the World. P. 437-440; A Donation to Those Interested in Curiosities. P. 447-452; The Overall Survey of the Ocean’s Shores. P. 457-461.

Chapter 11: Book of the Gods and Rites. P. 397-398 and 403-409.

Chapter 13: The Chronicle of the Seeker. P. 257-259; Meadows of Gold. P. 380-386.

Chapters 14 & 16: Table Talk. P 69-76; Book of the Family. P. 95-100; Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina. P. 106-109.

Chapters 15 & 17: The Chronicle of Guinea. P. 86-89; Agreements with Columbus. P. 89-91; General History of the Things of New Spain. P. 127-133.

Chapter 18: The Interesting Narrative of Olaudah Equiano Written by Himself. P. 204-211.

Chapter 19: Letter to Shah Ismail of Persia. P. 57-60; Legal Opinions. P. 64-68.

Chapter 20: Peter the Great Edicts and Decrees. P. 173-177; Kangxi, Self Portrait. P. 235-241 ; Letter to Lord George Macartney. P. 241-244.

Chapters 21 & 23 : Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizens. P. 181-182, 188-189; The Jamaica Letter. P. 195, 200-203.

Chapters 22 & 26: The Wealth of Nations. P. 165, 169-173; Testimony before Parliamentary Committees on Working Conditions in England. P. 265-272; The Communist Manifesto. P. 275-281.

Chapters 24 & 27: Speech before the French National Assembly. P. 292-293, 301-304; Standard Treaty. P. 309-312.

Chapter 25: Letter to Queen Victoria. P. 337-342; The Three People’s Principles and the Future of the Chinese People. P. 345-349.

Chapter 28: Mud and Khaki, Memoirs of an Incomplete Soldier. P. 371-373, 377-381; What is to be done? P. 385-389.

Chapter 29: The Results of the First Five-Year Plan. P. 389-393; Mein Kampf. P. 394-399; Rudolf Hess, Memoirs. P. 405-411.

Chapter 30: Indian Home Rule. P. 440-445; Speech to the Nation. P. 453-455; Report on an investigation of the peasant movement in Hunan and strategic problems of China’s revolutionary War. P. 457-461.

Chapters 31 & 32: The Long Telegram. P. 466-474; Telegram. P. 474-477. Perestroika. P. 502-506, 511-515.

Chapter 33: Declaration of Jihad against Americans...P. 515-522; World Development Indicators. P. 525-527, 533-537.

Activities in Class 

  1. Lectures using transparencies.
  2. Videos
  3. Essays
  4. Chapters’ Quizzes
  5. Reviews

 Homework 

  1. Read Text Book Chapters (30-50 pages weekly)
  2. Complete Vocabulary / Meanings
  3. Complete Chapters’ Charts (2-4)
  4. Read Primary Documents in the Human Record (around 10 pages weekly).

 Emergency Procedures:

In case of Fire Alarm, take your things with you and quickly and carefully follow the escape route; only in case that you are told that it is a fire drill, you will leave your stuff in the classroom. In case of a Red Code we will lock the room doors and turn off the lights; students must stay away from doors and windows and stay very quiet.

For more information on course content, visit:
http://www.fldoe.org/bii/curriculum/social_studies/

For information on Progress Reports, Report Cards and the school calendar, visit
http://hhs.dadeschools.net/


Hialeah Senior High
Course Title: U.S. History
Course Code: 2100310
Instructor: Mr. Carlos J. Diaz
305-822 1500
cardi55@comcast.net & diazc55@dadeschools.net

 

Course Description: A chronological and thematic study of U.S. History from the Civil War to the post-cold war era.

 Method of Instruction: Lectures using class’ website and /or transparencies; questions, debate, and knowledge contests; considerable use of audiovisuals (educational video programs, multimedia presentations, documentaries, and historical films). Independent study or homework, including analysis of movies, research projects, etc. as well as cooperative learning activities.

 Course Objectives:

 1-To study major themes in U.S. History from the American Civil War to the present time.

2- To promote bilingualism and cooperative learning (stressing the development of proficiency in English for ESOL students); promote the development of the individual skills and talents of each student; to teach how to compare and contrast historical events; to identify facts from opinions; to use, understand, and/or elaborate primary sources, graphs, statistics, maps and political cartoons; to analyze causes and effects; to work with biographies, timelines, chronologies, almanacs and encyclopedias.

3-To reinforce note-taking, reading skills and independent study. To prepare the students to use technology as a critical tool for historical research, preparing projects and other academic activities. To recognize the steps of inquiry as stating the problem, gathering data, developing a hypothesis, analyzing and evaluating the information, and reaching a conclusion.

4-To integrate geography and history, and to use the best examples of world cinema as a support for a better understanding of historical events.

5-To promote tolerance and interaction to/with other human beings and different cultures; to create a better understanding of the moral, ethical, and legal obligations that all human beings have toward each other. To teach the meaning of democracy and to develop social and political participation skills; to acquire critical thinking and decision-making skills.

 

Course Topics, and Weeks:

 š   1st NINE WEEKS.

1st WEEK: General Information

2nd WEEK: US Geography.

3rd & 4th WEEK: Civil War & Reconstruction

5th. WEEK: The West

6th - 8th WEEK: Industrial Revolution, Immigration, Reforming Spirit, Progressivism, Foundation of the American Culture.

9th. WEEK: Review

 

š     š   2nd NINE WEEKS

10th & 11th. WEEK: Imperialism

12th & 13th. WEEK: WW I.

14th - 15th WEEK: Roaring Twenties

16th. & 17th. WEEK: The Great Depression

18th WEEK: Review

 

---------    C H R I S T M A S     R E C E S S --------

 

š     š   3rd NINE WEEKS

19th. WEEK: WW II

20th. -21st. WEEK: Truman & Eisenhower Years (Early Cold War)

22nd. WEEK: Kennedy, Johnson, & Civil Rights Movement

23rd. WEEK: Nixon, Ford, & Carter

24th. WEEK: Reagan Administration

25th. WEEK: George H. W. Bush & Clinton

26th. WEEK: George W. Bush & Obama

27th. WEEK: Review

 

------------S P R I N G    B R E A K--------------

 

š      š 4th NINE WEEKS

28th. & 29th. WEEK: Issues of the 21st. Century

30th. WEEK: Review #1

31st.  WEEK: Review #2

32nd..WEEK: Review #3

33rd - 35th. WEEK:  General Review

36th. WEEK: Reserve

 

Texts and Materials

 1-United States History & Geography: Modern Times, by McGraw-Hill Education (Online version:

https://www.mheonline.com/onlinesamples/program.php?subject=4&program=79&p=4 )

2-Several short readings

3-Films ( http://home.comcast.net/~diaz1955/videos.htm )

4-Classic works of World Literature
(
http://home.comcast.net/~cardi55/my_classroom.htm#Book1 )

5-Educational videos, documentaries, and other presentations:

a. Annenberg: A Biography of America
b.
Educational Portal: US History I
c.
Educational Portal: Civil war & Reconstruction
d.
Educational Portal: US History II
e.
Educational Portal: Vietnam War
f.
Crash Course US History
g.
Khan Academy: US History
h.
The Century: America's Time
i.
 American Art History: Robert Hughes American Visions 
j. http://home.comcast.net/~DiazWHPresent/index.htm (PowerPoint Presentations)

k. http://www.youtube.com/  (Look for Topic), and other resources.

6-Students and parents should use the class’ website designed to help them with all the activities and assignments of the course: http://DiazSocialStudies.org

 Grading Policy

 All academic evaluations will be based on the letter grade system (A, B, C, D, F); I usually grade on a curve, according the results of the class in each evaluation. In Conduct: students that had to be warned from time to time for behavioral problems may receive B/C; students that were sent to CSI at least once for disruptive behavior may receive D/F. In Effort: students with A, B, C will receive 1; students with D will receive 2; and students with F will receive 3. If for whatever reason you enter the class during the last 3 weeks of the academic period, you will receive Incomplete (I). For class participation you will receive 5% of your grade. The best students will receive certificates every month, medals at the end of the nine weeks, and trophies at the end of the school year. 

1-Quizzes (one per chapter), Thinking Maps, Knowledge Contests (in teams)

20%

2-Classwork (one per chapter / in teams)

20%

3-Reseach Projects (one per month / homework in teams)

20%

4-Reading Quizzes (one per chapter)

15%

5-Film Analysis (homework / 5 per nine weeks)

15%

6-Primary Sources and Essays

5%

7-Class Participation

5%

Notes: Bring Index Cards & a Dictionary to Quizzes. Do Make-up Work (Chapter Summary / two pages per “F”) to replace any “F” with a “C”. Any work received late will receive a lower grade.

 

 Other Course Components

All students are expected to take notes during lectures, ask questions when necessary and participate in debates and discussions. Compliance with homework deadlines will affect the grades. Projects and Film Analysis have very clear guidelines to follow; you will receive them at the beginning of the school year or you can access them in the class website (section My Classroom). Plagiarism and/or cheating of any kind will not be tolerated. The deadline for video analysis is always the Friday before the last week of the period of nine weeks. Dates for quizzes and projects will be announced in class.

 Homework

1-Use / read Lecture Notes in class website and textbook chapters to prepare for quizzes.

2-Prepare Index Cards

3-Do make-up work to replace any “F”.

4-Watch educational videos included in Lecture Notes in class website.

5-Do Film Analysis from the class list using provided form.

6-Research Projects in teams.

7-Do and bring any pending work caused by absences.

8-Prepare for Knowledge Contests using study guides provided.

9-Do specific activities (Thinking Maps, Essays, extra chapters from workbook, etc.) assigned for homework.

 Classroom Rules & Discipline

 1-RESPECT AND GOOD MANNERS ARE REQUIRED

2-BRING AN ENGLISH-SPANISH DICTIONARY TO CLASS EVERYDAY

3-ASK FOR PERMISSION TO INTERRUPT BY RAISING YOUR HAND

4-BRING A #2 PENCIL THE DAYS OF QUIZZES AND TESTS

5-DO NOT USE ANY ELECTRONIC DEVICE DURING CLASS

 THOSE WHO VIOLATE THE RULES MAY BE SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING MEASURES

1-WARNING (1st)

2-DETENTION (2nd)

3-BE TEMPORARILY EXCLUDED FROM THE CLASSROOM (CSI) (3rd)

4-PARENT CONFERENCE MEETING (3rd)

5-REFERRAL TO AN ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL

6-SUSPENSION

7-DEFINITIVE EXPELLING

 

Emergency Procedures:

 In case of Fire Alarm, take your things with you and quickly and carefully follow the escape route; only in case that you are told that it is a fire drill, you will leave your stuff in the classroom. In case of a Red Code we will lock the room doors and turn off the lights; students must stay away from doors and windows and stay very quiet.

 For more information on course content, visit
http://www.fldoe.org/student/#acad

For information on Progress Reports, Report Cards and the school calendar, visit
http://hhs.dadeschools.net/


Hialeah Senior High
Course Title: American Government / American Government Honors
Course Code: 2106310 / 2106320
Instructor: Mr. Carlos J. Diaz
305-822 1500
cardi55@comcast.net

Course Description: A chronological and thematic study of the American government as a system and its major policies, from the creation of the constitution to the post-cold war era.

Method of Instruction: Lectures using transparencies; questions, debate, and knowledge contests; considerable use of audiovisuals (educational video programs, multimedia presentations, documentaries, and video clips from films). Independent study or homework, including reading, analyzing movies, and doing research are major components of the instructional process, as well as the use of cooperative learning strategies.

Course Objectives:

1-To understand the structure, functions, and purposes of government and how the principles and values of American democracy are reflected in American constitutional government. To understand the role of the citizen in American democracy.

2- To promote bilingualism and cooperative learning (stress the development of proficiency in Spanish for Bilingual Academy students and in English for BCC students); promote the development of the individual skills and talents of each student (Gifted); to teach the students to compare and contrast political events, systems, and parties; to identify facts from opinions; to use, understand, and/or elaborate primary sources, graphs, statistics tables, maps and political cartoons; to analyze causes and effects; to work with biographies, timelines, chronologies, almanacs and encyclopedias.

3-To reinforce note-taking, reading skills and independent study. To prepare the students to use technology as a critical tool for political research, preparing projects and other academic activities. To recognize the steps of inquiry as stating the problem, gathering data, developing a hypothesis, analyzing and evaluating the information, and reaching a conclusion

4-To recognize the major works of the Founding Fathers, political analysts and scholars with regard to the American Government and Politics / American Economy; to integrate geography and politics, and to use the best examples of world cinema as a support for a better understanding of political / economic events.

6-To promote tolerance and interaction to/with other human beings and different cultures; to create a better understanding of the moral, ethical, and legal obligations that all human beings have toward each other. To teach the meaning of democracy and to develop social and political participation skills; to acquire critical thinking and decision-making skills. To predict political trends using data from surveys, pools, etc.

 

Course Topics, Units, and Dates:

FIRST SEMESTER: GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

1st NINE WEEKS:

1st WEEK: General Information

2nd & 3rd WEEK: Historical Foundations

4th & 5th WEEK: Participating in Politics

6th & 7th WEEK: Legislative Branch (U.S. Congress)

8th & 9th WEEK: Executive Branch

2nd NINE WEEKS:

10th & 11th WEEK: Judicial Branch

12th & 13th WEEK: State & Local Government

14th & 15th WEEK: Political Systems

16th & 17th WEEK: Current Events

18th. & 19th.  WEEK: Review & Mid-Term Exams

---------    C H R I S T M A S     R E C E S S --------

Texts and Materials:

1-Magruder's American Government

2-Short readings from Time & Newsweek magazines

3-Films ( http://home.comcast.net/~DiazVideos/videos.htm )

4-Multimedia presentations and documentaries
( http://home.comcast.net/~cardi55/my_classroom.htm#Software1 ) and other resources.

5-Students and parents should use the following Web Site designed to help them with all the activities and assignments of the course: http://DiazSocialStudies.org

 

Grading Policy

All academic evaluations will be based on the letter grade system (A, B, C, D, F); I usually grade on a curve, according the results of the class in each evaluation. In Conduct: students that had to be warned from time to time for behavioral problems may receive B/C; students that were sent to CSI at least once for disruptive behavior may receive D/F. In Effort: students with A, B, C will receive 1; students with D will receive 2; and students with F will receive 3. If for whatever reason you enter the class during the last 3 weeks of the academic period, you will receive Incomplete (I). For class participation you will receive 5% of your grade. The best students will receive certificates every month and trophies at the end of the school year.

Projects by Teams...................................30%

Quizzes & Classwork by Units...............30%

Reading Quizzes & Articles....................20%

Video Analysis & Essays........................15%

Class Participation & Others... .................5%


Other Course Components & Specifics

All students are expected to take notes during lectures, ask questions when necessary and participate in debates and discussions. Compliance with homework deadlines will affect the grades. Projects, Book Reports, and Video Analysis have very clear guidelines to follow; you will receive them at the beginning of the school year or you can access them in the class website (section My Classroom). Plagiarism and/or cheating in any kind of academic evaluation / homework will not be tolerated. Students can develop and bring index cards to the quizzes. The deadline for video analysis and book reports is always the Friday before the last week of the period of nine weeks. Dates for quizzes and projects will be announced in class.

 

Classroom Rules & Discipline

1-RESPECT AND GOOD MANNERS ARE REQUIRED

2-BRING AN ENGLISH-SPANISH DICTIONARY TO CLASS EVERYDAY

3-ASK FOR PERMISSION TO INTERRUPT BY RAISING YOUR HAND
4-BRING A #2 PENCIL THE DAYS OF QUIZZES AND TESTS
5-DO NOT USE ANY ELECTRONIC DEVICE DURING CLASS

 

THOSE WHO VIOLATE THE RULES MAY BE SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING MEASURES

1-WARNING (1st)

2-DETENTION (2nd)

3-BE TEMPORARILY EXCLUDED FROM THE CLASSROOM (CSI) (3rd)

4-PARENT CONFERENCE MEETING (3rd)

5-REFERRAL TO AN ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL

6-SUSPENSION

7-DEFINITIVE EXPELLING

 

 Emergency Procedures:

 In case of Fire Alarm, take your things with you and quickly and carefully follow the escape route; only in case that you are told that it is a fire drill, you will leave your stuff in the classroom. In case of a Red Code we will lock the room doors and turn off the lights; students must stay away from doors and windows and stay very quiet.

For more information on course content, visit
http://www.fldoe.org/bii/curriculum/social_studies/

For information on Progress Reports, Report Cards and the school calendar, visit
http://hhs.dadeschools.net/


 Hialeah Senior High
Course Title: Economics / Economics Honors
Course Code: 2102310 / 2102320
Instructor: Mr. Carlos J. Diaz
305-822 1500
cardi55@comcast.net

Course Description: A thematic study of Economics (macro and micro), stressing major characteristics of the free enterprise system and the American economy in particular.

Method of Instruction: Lectures using transparencies; questions, debate, and knowledge contests; considerable use of audiovisuals (educational video programs, multimedia presentations, documentaries, and video clips from films). Independent study or homework, including reading, analyzing movies, and doing research are major components of the instructional process, as well as the use of cooperative learning strategies.

Course Objectives:

1-To understand how scarcity requires individuals and institutions to make choices about how to use resources; to understand the characteristics of different economic systems and institutions; to understand the role of the government, businesses, and labor in the economic process; to comprehend how the banking system and the Federal Reserve system work; to learn the role of consumers in our society.

2- To promote bilingualism and cooperative learning (stress the development of proficiency in Spanish for Bilingual Academy students and in English for BCC students); promote the development of the individual skills and talents of each student (Gifted) to teach the students to compare and contrast economic events and systems; to identify facts from opinions; to use, understand, and/or elaborate primary sources, graphs, statistics tables, maps and political cartoons; to analyze causes and effects; to work with biographies, timelines, chronologies, almanacs and encyclopedias.

4-To reinforce note-taking, reading skills and independent study. To prepare the students to use technology as a critical tool for economic research, preparing projects and other academic activities. To recognize the steps of inquiry as stating the problem, gathering data, developing a hypothesis, analyzing and evaluating the information, and reaching a conclusion

5-To recognize the major works of significant economic analysts and scholars with regard to the American Economy; to integrate geography and economics, and to use the best examples of American cinema as a support for a better understanding of economic events.

6-To promote tolerance and interaction to/with other human beings and different cultures; to create a better understanding of the moral, ethical, and legal obligations that all human beings have toward each other; to acquire critical thinking and decision-making skills. To predict economic trends using data from economic indicators, surveys, pools, etc.

 

Course Topics, Units, and Dates:

SECOND SEMESTER: ECONOMICS

3rd NINE WEEKS:

20th & 21st WEEK: Basic Economic Concepts

22nd WEEK: World Economy

23rd WEEK: Economic Systems

24th WEEK: Free Enterprise Economy

25th WEEK: The Role of Businesses

26th WEEK: The Role of Labor

28th WEEK: The Role of Government

29th WEEK: Money, Credit, and Banking

------------S P R I N G    B R E A K--------------

4th NINE WEEKS:

30th WEEK: Economic Performance

31st & 32nd. WEEK: Personal Economics

33rd WEEK: International Trade

34th WEEK: Current Economic Issues

35th WEEK: Reserve

36th & 37th WEEK: Review & Final Exam

Texts and Materials:

1-Economics (Addison-Wesley)

2-Short readings from Time, Newsweek, and Fortune magazines

3-Films ( http://home.comcast.net/~DiazVideos/videos.htm )

4-Multimedia presentations and documentaries
( http://home.comcast.net/~cardi55/my_classroom.htm#Software1 ) and other resources.

5-Students and parents should use the following Web Site designed to help them with all the activities and assignments of the course: http://DiazSocialStudies.org


Grading Policy:

All academic evaluations will be based on the letter grade system (A, B, C, D, F); I usually grade on a curve, according the results of the class in each evaluation. In Conduct: students that had to be warned from time to time for behavioral problems may receive B/C; students that were sent to CSI at least once for disruptive behavior may receive D/F. In Effort: students with A, B, C will receive 1; students with D will receive 2; and students with F will receive 3. If for whatever reason you enter the class during the last 3 weeks of the academic period, you will receive Incomplete (I). For class participation you will receive 5% of your grade. The best students will receive certificates every month and trophies at the end of the school year.

Projects by teams & Stock Market Game....30%

Quizzes & Classwork by Units....................30%

Readings Quizzes & Articles.......................20%

Video Analysis & Essays.............................15%

Class Participation & Others... .....................5%


Other Course Components & Specifics

All students are expected to take notes during lectures, ask questions when necessary and participate in debates and discussions. Compliance with homework deadlines will affect the grades. Projects, Book Reports, and Video Analysis have very clear guidelines to follow; you will receive them at the beginning of the school year or you can access them in the class website (section My Classroom). Plagiarism and/or cheating of any kind in academic evaluations / homework will not be tolerated. Students can develop and bring index cards to the quizzes. The deadline for video analysis and book reports is always the Friday before the last week of the period of nine weeks. Dates for quizzes and projects will be announced in class.

Classroom Rules & Discipline

1-RESPECT AND GOOD MANNERS ARE REQUIRED

2-BRING AN ENGLISH-SPANISH DICTIONARY TO CLASS EVERYDAY

3-ASK FOR PERMISSION TO INTERRUPT BY RAISING YOUR HAND

4-BRING A #2 PENCIL THE DAYS OF QUIZZES AND TESTS

5-DO NOT USE ANY ELECTRONIC DEVICE DURING CLASS

 

THOSE WHO VIOLATE THE RULES MAY BE SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING MEASURES

1-WARNING (1st)

2-DETENTION (2nd)

3-BE TEMPORARILY EXCLUDED FROM THE CLASSROOM (CSI) (3rd)

4-PARENT CONFERENCE MEETING (3rd)

5-REFERRAL TO AN ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL

6-SUSPENSION

7-DEFINITIVE EXPELLING

Emergency Procedures:

In case of Fire Alarm, take your things with you and quickly and carefully follow the escape route; only in case that you are told that it is a fire drill, you will leave your stuff in the classroom. In case of a Red Code we will lock the room doors and turn off the lights; students must stay away from doors and windows and stay very quiet.

For more information on course content, visit
http://www.fldoe.org/bii/curriculum/social_studies/

For information on Progress Reports, Report Cards and the school calendar, visit
http://hhs.dadeschools.net/


Hialeah Senior High
Course Title: Philosophy Honors
Course Code: 2120910
Instructor: Mr. Carlos J. Diaz
305-822 1500 Ext 2478
cardi55@comcast.net

Course Description: A chronological and thematic study of the History of Philosophy from ancient times to the present. This is a semester course (0.5 credits)

Method of Instruction: Lectures using transparencies and PowerPoint presentations; questions, debate,  knowledge contests and the use of audiovisuals. Independent study or homework, including reading and doing research projects are major components of the instructional process.

Major Concepts/Content: The learner will explore the foundations of philosophy through a historical exploration of the great thinkers. The course will focus on the definition and application of philosophy, appropriate vocabulary, and the notion that everyone should be engaged in the ‘doing’ of philosophy.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:
–definition and application of philosophy
–major schools of philosophy
–vocabulary of philosophy
–master philosophers
–development of a personal philosophy

After successfully completing this course the student will:
Reflect on and question the basis of knowledge and experience, develop a personal mode of thought based on critical examination of evidence and argument, formulate rational arguments, demonstrate understanding of subjective and ideological biases, relate specific texts and authors to the examination of concepts and problems, demonstrate understanding of the impact of significant people, ideas, and events on the development of ideas, values, and social, economic, and political institutions in Eastern and Western civilizations, apply research, study, critical thinking and decision-making skills and demonstrate the use of new and emerging technology in problem solving.

Sunshine State Standards:

SS.A.2.4.4, SS.A.2.4.4, SS.C.1.4.1, SS.A.3.4.9, SS.A.5.4.7, SS.C.2.4.3, SS.C.2.4.5, SS.C.2.4, SS.A.5.4.1, SS.A.5.4., SS.C.2.4.1, SS.A.2.4.9, SS.A.3.4.2, SS.A.3.4.6, SS.C.1.4.1, SS.A.1.4.3, SS.A.1.4.4.

 

Scope and Sequence:

Week 1: General Information

Week 2: What is Philosophy? (Ch 1)

Week 3: Hindu & Chinese Philosophies

Week 4: Pres-Socratic Philosophy (Ch 2)

Week 5: Socrates, Plato and Aristotle (Ch 3 & 4)

Week 6: Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy (Ch 5)

Week 7: Medieval Philosophy: Scholasticism (Ch 5)

Week 8: Empiricism and Rationalism (Ch 6)

Week 9: Enlightenment, Kant, German Classical Philosophy, Marxism, Positivism, Utilitarism, Evolutionism, and Psychoanalysis. (Ch 7)

Week 10: Existentialism. (Ch 8)

Week 11: American Philosophy (Transcendentalism & Pragmatism) and Analytic Philosophy (Logical  Positivism, Russell, Wittgenstein, and others). (Ch 9)

Week 12: Post-Colonial Thought (Ch 17)

Week 13: An Era of Suspicion: Structuralism, Post-Modernism, and Deconstructionism. (Ch 15)

Week 14: Moral and Political Philosophy (Ch 10-12)

Week 15: Philosophy and Religion (Ch 13)

Week 16: Feminist Philosophy (Ch 14)

Week 17 & 18: Review

Week 19: Final Exam

 

Texts and Materials

 -Philosophy: The Power of Ideas. Authors: Brook Moore and Kenneth Bruder. McGraw Hill, 2002.  See Themes, Objectives, Glossary, and Quizzes at:  http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/076742011x/student_view0/

-Essentials of Philosophy: The Basic Concepts of the World’s Greatest Thinkers. Author: James Mannion. New York : Barnes & Noble, 2006.

-Philosophy: Spark Charts. Barnes & Noble, 2002.

-Philosophy and Religion Articles at: http://www.dwillard.org/articles/phillist.asp  and
                                                             http://www.buzzle.com/chapters/archives-238.asp

-Lecture Notes and Websites at:  http://diazsocialstudies.org/   or  http://home.comcast.net/~cardi55/

 

 Grading Policy:

 All academic evaluations will be based on the letter grade system (A, B, C, D, F); I usually grade on a curve, according the results of the class in each evaluation. In Conduct: students that had to be warned from time to time for behavioral problems may receive B/C; students that were sent to CSI at least once for disruptive behavior may receive D/F. In Effort: students with A, B, C will receive 1; students with D will receive 2; and students with F will receive 3. If for whatever reason you enter the class during the last 3 weeks of the academic period, you will receive Incomplete (I). For class participation you will receive 5% of your grade. The best students will receive certificates every month and trophies at the end of the school year.

Projects by Teams (1 per Nine Weeks)...........................20%

Quizzes (1 per Week).........................................................30% (1 Grade each)

Reading Online Articles (1 per Week)............................20% (1 Grade each)

Class Participation (Weekly Seminars)...........................20%

My List of Answers / My Philosophy............................10% (At the end of every nine weeks)


Classroom Rules & Discipline

1-RESPECT AND GOOD MANNERS ARE REQUIRED

2-BRING A DICTIONARY TO CLASS EVERYDAY

3-ASK FOR PERMISSION TO INTERRUPT BY RAISING YOUR HAND
4-BRING A #2 PENCIL THE DAYS OF QUIZZES AND TESTS
5-DO NOT USE ANY ELECTRONIC DEVICE DURING CLASS

 

THOSE WHO VIOLATES THE RULES MAY BE SUBJECTED TO THE FOLLOWING MEASURES

1-WARNING (1st)

2-DETENTION (2nd)

3-BE TEMPORARILY EXCLUDED FROM THE CLASSROOM (CSI) (3rd)

4-PARENT CONFERENCE MEETING (3rd)

5-REFERRAL TO AN ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL

6-SUSPENSION

7-DEFINITIVE EXPELLING

 

Emergency Procedures:

 In case of Fire Alarm, take your things with you and quickly and carefully follow the escape route; only in case that you are told that it is a fire drill you will leave your stuff in the classroom. In case of a Red Code we will lock the room doors and turn off the lights; students must stay away from doors and windows and stay very quiet.

 For information on Progress Reports, Report Cards and the school calendar, visit
http://hhs.dadeschools.net/

 


Hialeah Senior High
Course Title: World Religions
Course Code: 2105310
Instructor: Mr. Carlos J. Diaz
305-822 1500 Ext 2478
cardi55@comcast.net

 

Course Description: A chronological and thematic study of the World Religions from ancient times to the present. This is a semester course (0.5 credits)

 

Method of Instruction: Lectures using transparencies and PowerPoint presentations; educational CD ROMs from the series “Zane Home Library” followed by questions and debate (in seminar format, using Socratic dialogue); films, and independent study or homework (reading articles and writing responses and research projects) are major components of the instructional process.

Major concepts/content

Through the study of world religions, students acquire an understanding of the way people in different cultures satisfy their spiritual needs. Students understand the place of religion in culture, the importance that has been attached to religion in peoples' lives and the relationship between religion and other social institutions.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following:

-Sources of religion
-Basis for peoples' religious beliefs
-Major living religious traditions and practices, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Shintoism, Zoroastrianism, and other beliefs.

After successfully completing this course, the student will:

1. Identify criteria upon which religious beliefs are based.

2. Analyze relationships between religious and social institutions.

3. Trace the major developments of the world's living religions.

4. List the similarities and differences among the world's living religions.

5. Synthesize information and ideas from conflicting religious beliefs.

6. Interpret the development of a society as reflected by its religious beliefs.

 

Sunshine State Standards:

SS.A.2.4.4, SS.A.2.4.4, SS.C.1.4.1, SS.A.3.4.9, SS.A.5.4.7, SS.C.2.4.3, SS.C.2.4.5, SS.C.2.4, SS.A.5.4.1, SS.A.5.4., SS.C.2.4.1, SS.A.2.4.9, SS.A.3.4.2, SS.A.3.4.6, SS.C.1.4.1, SS.A.1.4.3, SS.A.1.4.4.

 

Scope and Sequence:

Week 1: General Information

Week 2: Understanding Religion. Chapter 1, Q1

Week 3: Primitive Religions: Prehistory, Animism, Shamanism, Totemism, etc. Chapter 2, Q2

Week 4: Mythologies: Egyptian, Greek, Celtic, Norse, Arabic, etc. Q3

Week 5: Hinduism. Chapter 3, Q4

Week 6: Buddhism. Chapter 4, Q5

Week 7: Jainism & Sikhism. Chapter 5, Q6

Week 8: Zoroastrianism. Q7

Week 9: Shinto, Chapter 7, Q8

Week 10: Judaism. Chapter 8, Q9

Week 11: Christianity. Chapter 9, Q10

Week 12: Islam. Chapter 10, Q11

Week 13: Alternative Paths / Other Beliefs. Chapter 11, Q12

Week 14: Religion Today. Chapter 12, Q13

Weeks 14-16: Review

Weeks 17-18: Final Exam

 

Texts and Materials

- Experiencing the World's Religions. Author: Michael Molloy. McGraw Hill, 2002.  See Chapters’ Outlines, Objectives, Glossary, and Quizzes at:

http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0767420438/student_view0/chapter1/chapter_outline.html

-The World Religions. Author: Huston Smith. New York: Harper Collins, 1991.

-World Religions: Spark Charts. Barnes & Noble, 2002.

-Articles on Religion at: http://www.religion-online.org/ , http://www.vision.org/visionmedia/overview.aspx?id=101&gclid , and http://www.magportal.com/c/soc/relig/

-Lecture Notes and Websites at:  http://diazsocialstudies.org/   or  http://home.comcast.net/~cardi55/

 

 Grading Policy:

All academic evaluations will be based on the letter grade system (A, B, C, D, F); I usually grade on a curve, according the results of the class in each evaluation. In Conduct: students that had to be warned from time to time for behavioral problems may receive B/C; students that were sent to CSI at least once for disruptive behavior may receive D/F. In Effort: students with A, B, C will receive 1; students with D will receive 2; and students with F will receive 3. If for whatever reason you enter the class during the last 3 weeks of the academic period, you will receive Incomplete (I). For class participation you will receive 5% of your grade. The best students will receive certificates every month and trophies at the end of the school year.

Projects by Teams (1 per Nine Weeks)...........................20%

Quizzes (1 per Week).........................................................30% (1 Grade each)

Reading Online Articles (1 per Week)............................20% (1 Grade each)

Class Participation (Weekly Seminars)...........................20%

My Pros & Cons List.........................................................10% (At the end of every nine weeks)

 

Classroom Rules & Discipline

 1-RESPECT AND GOOD MANNERS ARE REQUIRED

2-BRING A DICTIONARY TO CLASS EVERYDAY

3-ASK FOR PERMISSION TO INTERRUPT BY RAISING YOUR HAND
4-BRING A #2 PENCIL THE DAYS OF QUIZZES AND TESTS
5-DO NOT USE ANY ELECTRONIC DEVICE DURING CLASS

 

THOSE WHO VIOLATES THE RULES MAY BE SUBJECTED TO THE FOLLOWING MEASURES

1-WARNING (1st)

2-DETENTION (2nd)

3-BE TEMPORARILY EXCLUDED FROM THE CLASSROOM (CSI) (3rd)

4-PARENT CONFERENCE MEETING (3rd)

5-REFERRAL TO AN ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL

6-SUSPENSION

7-DEFINITIVE EXPELLING

 

Emergency Procedures:

In case of Fire Alarm, take your things with you and quickly and carefully follow the escape route; only in case that you are told that it is a fire drill you will leave your stuff in the classroom. In case of a Red Code we will lock the room doors and turn off the lights; students must stay away from doors and windows and stay very quiet.

 

For information on Progress Reports, Report Cards and the school calendar, visit
http://hhs.dadeschools.net/


 

19-Lesson Plan for Today

Dear Substitute:

Thanks for your support,

Mr. Díaz


Send me your comments to: Cardi55@comcast.net

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